cross vault
noun Date: 1850 a vault formed by the intersection of two or more simple vaults — called also cross vaulting

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cross vault — noun or cross vaulting Etymology: cross (III) : a vault formed by the intersection of two or more simple vaults see vault illustration * * * n. a vault formed by the intersection of two or more vaults …   Useful english dictionary

  • cross vault —    In architecture, two barrel vaults intersecting each other at right angles. Also called a groin vault …   Glossary of Art Terms

  • cross-vault — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Cross-vaulting — Cross vault ing ( v?lt ?ng), n. (Arch.) Vaulting formed by the intersection of two or more simple vaults. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cross-vaulting — cross vaultˈing noun Vaulting formed by the intersection of simple vaults • • • Main Entry: ↑cross …   Useful english dictionary

  • vault —    In architecture, an arched roof or covering of masonry construction made of brick, stone, or concrete. A barrel (or tunnel) vault is semi cylindrical in cross section, made up of a continuous row of arches joined to one another. A groin or… …   Glossary of Art Terms

  • cross-barrel vault —    In architecture, a barrel (or tunnel) vault in which the main barrel (tunnel) vault is intersected at right angles with other barrel (tunnel) vaults at regular intervals. Also see cross vault …   Glossary of Art Terms

  • Vault —    An arched ceiling built of brick, stone, or concrete. Of these materials, concrete is the most effective as it allows for greater expanses since it forms one solid, rigid, surface requiring a lesser number of internal supports. The solid… …   Dictionary of Renaissance art

  • cross vaulting — noun see cross vault …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • cross vaulting — noun see cross vault …   Useful english dictionary

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