cratch
noun Etymology: Middle English cracche, from Anglo-French creche manger — more at crèche Date: 13th century 1. archaic manger 2. a crib or rack especially for fodder; also frame

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cratch — (kr?ch; 224), n. [OE. cracche, crecche, F. cr[ e]che crib, manger, fr. OHG. krippa, krippea, G. krippe crib. See {Crib}.] A manger or open frame for hay; a crib; a rack. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Begin from first where He encradled was, In simple… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cratch — [krach] n. [ME crecche < OFr grecha, crib: see CRÈCHE] [Brit. Dial.] a bin or rack for fodder …   English World dictionary

  • cratch — noun The vertical planks at the forward end of the hold of a traditional English narrowboat which constrain the cargo and support the top plank or walkway. The fore end of the cargo space terminates in a triangular board, called the cratch,… …   Wiktionary

  • cratch —  • a rack. A BOTTLE CRATCH, a bottle rack. North.  • , critch  a rack. S …   A glossary of provincial and local words used in England

  • cratch — /krach/, n. Archaic. a crib for fodder; manger. [1175 1225; ME cracche < dial. OF crache, var. of creche CRÈCHE] * * * …   Universalium

  • cratch — I Mawdesley Glossary a rack for hay. II Gullah Words n and v scratch, scratches, scratched, scratching …   English dialects glossary

  • 'cratch — Gullah Words n and v scratch, scratches, scratched, scratching …   English dialects glossary

  • cratch — n. manger …   English contemporary dictionary

  • cratch — n. a rack used for holding food for farm animals out of doors. Etymology: ME f. OF creche f. Gmc: rel. to CRIB …   Useful english dictionary

  • Cratch cradle — Cratch Cratch (kr?ch; 224), n. [OE. cracche, crecche, F. cr[ e]che crib, manger, fr. OHG. krippa, krippea, G. krippe crib. See {Crib}.] A manger or open frame for hay; a crib; a rack. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Begin from first where He encradled was …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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