connive
intransitive verb (connived; conniving) Etymology: French or Latin; French conniver, from Latin conivēre, connivēre to close the eyes, connive, from com- + -nivēre (akin to nictare to wink); akin to Old English & Old High German hnīgan to bow Date: 1601 1. to pretend ignorance of or fail to take action against something one ought to oppose <
the government connived in the rebels' military buildup
>
2. a. to be indulgent or in secret sympathy ; wink b. to cooperate secretly or have a secret understanding 3. conspire, intrigue <
accused his opponents of conniving to defeat the proposal
>
conniver noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Connive — Con*nive (k[o^]n*n[imac]v ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Connived} ( n[imac]vd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Conniving}.] [L. connivere to shut the eyes, connive, fr. con + (perh.) a word akin to nicere to beckon, nictare to wink.] 1. To open and close the eyes… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • connive — ► VERB 1) (connive at/in) secretly allow (a wrongdoing). 2) (often connive with) conspire. DERIVATIVES connivance noun. ORIGIN Latin connivere shut the eyes (to) …   English terms dictionary

  • connive — con·nive /kə nīv/ vt con·nived, con·niv·ing [Latin con(n)ivere to close one s eyes, knowingly overlook something]: to assent knowingly and wrongfully without opposition to another s wrongdoing; specif: to knowingly consent to a spouse s marital… …   Law dictionary

  • connive — [kə nīv′] vi. connived, conniving [< L conivere, to wink, connive < com , intens. + base akin to nictare, to wink < IE base * knei gwh , to bend > Goth hneiwan, to bend, bow, OE hnigian, to bow (the head)] 1. to pretend not to see or… …   English World dictionary

  • Connive — Con*nive , v. t. To shut the eyes to; to overlook; to pretend not to see. [R. & Obs.] Divorces were not connived only, but with eye open allowed. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • connive — (v.) c.1600, from L. connivere, also conivere to wink, hence, to wink at (a crime), be secretly privy, from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) + base akin to nictare to wink, from PIE root *kneigwh (see NICTITATE (Cf. nictitate)). Related …   Etymology dictionary

  • connive — [v] plot, scheme angle, be in cahoots with*, cabal, cogitate, collude, conspire, contrive, cook up, devise, diddle*, finagle, frame, frame up, intrigue, machinate, operate, promote, wangle, wire, work hand in glove*; concept 36 …   New thesaurus

  • connive — con|nive [kəˈnaıv] v [Date: 1600 1700; : French; Origin: conniver, from [i]Latin connivere to close the eyes, connive ] 1.) to not try to stop something wrong from happening connive at ▪ He would not be the first politician to connive at a shady… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • connive — UK [kəˈnaɪv] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms connive : present tense I/you/we/they connive he/she/it connives present participle conniving past tense connived past participle connived 1) to plan secretly, especially to do something that is… …   English dictionary

  • connive — v. 1) (D; intr.) to connive at; with 2) (E) they connived (with each other) to cheat her * * * [kə naɪv] with (D; intr.) to connive at (E) they connives (with each other) to cheat her …   Combinatory dictionary

  • connive — con|nive [ kə naıv ] verb intransitive 1. ) to plan secretly, especially to do something that is illegal or immoral: connive (with someone) to do something: The officials allegedly connived to take public funds for personal use. 2. ) to ignore… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”