confess
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French confesser, from confés having confessed, from Latin confessus, past participle of confitēri to confess, from com- + fatēri to confess; akin to Latin fari to speak — more at ban Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to tell or make known (as something wrong or damaging to oneself) ; admit <
he confessed his guilt
>
2. a. to acknowledge (sin) to God or to a priest b. to receive the confession of (a penitent) 3. to declare faith in or adherence to ; profess 4. to give evidence of intransitive verb 1. a. to disclose one's faults; specifically to unburden one's sins or the state of one's conscience to God or to a priest b. to hear a confession 2. admit, own <
confess to a crime
>
Synonyms: see acknowledgeconfessable adjective

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Confess — Con*fess , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Confessed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Confessing}.] [F. confesser, fr. L. confessus, p. p. of confiteri to confess; con + fateri to confess; akin to fari to speak. See 2d {Ban}, {Fame}.] 1. To make acknowledgment or avowal… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • confess — con·fess /kən fes/ vt: to admit (as a charge or allegation) as true, proven, or valid unless you answer, the petition shall be taken as confessed vi: to make a confession con·fes·sor /kən fe sər/ n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law …   Law dictionary

  • Confess — Con*fess , v. i. 1. To make confession; to disclose sins or faults, or the state of the conscience. [1913 Webster] Every tongue shall confess to God. Rom. xiv. 11. [1913 Webster] 2. To acknowledge; to admit; to concede. [1913 Webster] But since… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • confess — [kən fes′] vt. [ME confessen < OFr confesser < ML(Ec) * confessare < L confessus, pp. of confiteri, to acknowledge, confess < com , together + fateri, to acknowledge; akin to fari, to speak: see FAME] 1. a) to admit (a fault or crime) …   English World dictionary

  • confess — late 14c., from O.Fr. confesser (trans. and intrans.), from V.L. *confessare, from L. confess , pp. stem of confiteri to acknowledge, from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) + fateri to admit, akin to fari speak (see FAME …   Etymology dictionary

  • confess — avow, *acknowledge, admit, own Analogous words: *grant, concede, allow: disclose, divulge, *reveal, discover: *declare, proclaim, publish Antonyms: renounce (one s beliefs, principles) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • confess — [v] admit, confirm acknowledge, affirm, allow, assert, attest, aver, avow, blow, blurt out, chirp, clue in, come clean*, come out, concede, confide, declare, disclose, divulge, dump on*, evince, finger*, fink*, grant, humble oneself, leak*, let… …   New thesaurus

  • confess — ► VERB 1) admit to a crime or wrongdoing. 2) acknowledge reluctantly. 3) declare one s sins formally to a priest. 4) (of a priest) hear the confession of. ORIGIN Old French confesser, from Latin confiteri acknowledge …   English terms dictionary

  • confess */*/ — UK [kənˈfes] / US verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms confess : present tense I/you/we/they confess he/she/it confesses present participle confessing past tense confessed past participle confessed 1) a) to admit that you have committed a… …   English dictionary

  • confess — con|fess [kənˈfes] v [I and T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: confesser, from Latin confiteri to confess , from com ( COM ) + fateri to confess ] 1.) to admit, especially to the police, that you have done something wrong or illegal… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • confess — con|fess [ kən fes ] verb intransitive or transitive ** 1. ) to admit that you have committed a crime: After three hours of interrogation, he confessed everything. confess to someone: Eventually he confessed to the police. confess to (doing)… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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