commotion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French commocion, from Latin commotion-, commotio, from commovēre Date: 15th century 1. a condition of civil unrest or insurrection 2. steady or recurrent motion 3. mental excitement or confusion 4. a. an agitated disturbance ; to-do b. noisy confusion ; agitation

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • COMMOTION — COMMOTI Ébranlement traumatique d’un tissu ne laissant pas de lésion décelable. On admet que la commotion cérébrale explique la perte de connaissance initiale fréquente dans les traumatismes crâniens bénins. commotion [ komosjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1155;… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • commotion — commotion, agitation, tumult, turmoil, turbulence, confusion, convulsion, upheaval are comparable when they designate great physical, mental, or emotional excitement. All carry this general meaning yet have applications which fit them for… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Commotion — is a visual effects application, originally released by Puffin Designs. Puffin Designs was founded by Scott Squires (an award winning Visual Effects Supervisor at Industrial Light and Magic) and Forest Key to market Commotion. Commotion set a… …   Wikipedia

  • Commotion — Com*mo tion, n. [L. commotio: cf. F. commotion. See {Motion}.] 1. Disturbed or violent motion; agitation. [1913 Webster] [What] commotion in the winds ! Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A popular tumult; public disturbance; riot. [1913 Webster] When ye… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • commotion — COMMOTION. s. fém. Terme de Médecine. Ébranlement violent audedans du corps, causé par une chute, ou par quelque coup. Il y a à craindre que ce coup, que cette chute n ait fait commotion au cerveau. Il tomba de fort haut, ce qui lui causa une… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • commotion — Commotion. s. f. Terme de Medecine. Esbranlement violent, ou dans la substance du cerveau, ou dans tout le corps; causé par quelque cheute, ou par quelque coup. Il y a à craindre que ce coup. que cette cheute n ait fait commotion au cerveau. il… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • commotion — late 14c., from M.Fr. commocion violent motion, agitation (12c., Mod.Fr. commotion), from L. commotionem (nom. commotio) violent motion, agitation, noun of action from pp. stem of commovere to move, disturb, from com together, or thoroughly (see… …   Etymology dictionary

  • commotion — Commotion, Commotio. Cic. Petite commotion, Commotiuncula. Cic …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Commotion — Commotion.(v. lat.), 1) Erschütterung; 2) durch heftige Erschütterung, z.B. Schlag, Fall u. dgl. bewirkte Störung eines Organs, ohne eigentliche Trennung der Theile, bes. des Gehirns u. Rückenmarks. Daher Commoviren u. Commotioner (engl., spr.… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Commotion — Commotion, lat., Erschütterung, Stoß, auch die dadurch hervorgerufene Krankheit …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • commotion — I noun affray, agitatio, agitation, altercation, brawl, clamor, clash, conflict, confusion, convulsion, disorder, disorderliness, disorganization, disquiet, disquietude, disturbance, ebullition, embroilment, encounter, entanglement, eruption,… …   Law dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”