comma splice
noun Date: 1924 the unjustified use of a comma between coordinate main clauses not connected by a conjunction (as in “nobody goes there anymore, it's boring”)

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Comma splice — A comma splice is the use of a comma to join two independent clauses. For example: It is nearly half past five, we cannot reach town before dark.[1] Although acceptable in some languages and compulsory in others, comma splices are usually… …   Wikipedia

  • comma splice — noun : comma fault * * * Gram. See comma fault. [1920 25] * * * comma splice, = comma fault. (Cf. ↑comma fault) …   Useful english dictionary

  • comma splice — com′ma splice n. gram. comma fault • Etymology: 1920–25 …   From formal English to slang

  • comma splice — Gram. See comma fault. [1920 25] * * * …   Universalium

  • comma splice — noun Two independent clauses strung together with a comma in between. Example: I went to the store, I got a loaf of bread …   Wiktionary

  • comma — There is much variation in the use of the comma in print and in everyday writing. Essentially, its role is to give detail to the structure of sentences, especially longer ones, and to make their meaning clear by marking off words that either do… …   Modern English usage

  • Comma — For other uses, see Comma (disambiguation). , Comma Punctuation apostrophe …   Wikipedia

  • comma fault — noun : the careless or unjustified use of a comma between coordinate main clauses not connected by a conjunction called also comma splice * * * Gram. the use of a comma, rather than a semicolon, colon, or period, to separate related main clauses… …   Useful english dictionary

  • comma fault — Gram. the use of a comma, rather than a semicolon, colon, or period, to separate related main clauses in the absence of a coordinating conjunction: often considered to be incorrect or undesirable, esp. in formal writing. Also called comma splice …   Universalium

  • comma fault — noun Date: circa 1934 comma splice …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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