collogue
intransitive verb (collogued; colloguing) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1646 1. dialect intrigue, conspire 2. to talk privately ; confer

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Collogue — Col*logue , v. i. [Cf. L. colloqui and E. dialogue. Cf. {Collocution}.] To talk or confer secretly and confidentially; to converse, especially with evil intentions; to plot mischief. [Archaic or Colloq.] [1913 Webster] Pray go in; and, sister,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • collogue — 1590s (implied in colloguing) to flatter, curry favor, of unknown origin; perhaps from Fr. colloque conference, consultation (16c., from L. colloquium) and influenced by dialogue …   Etymology dictionary

  • collogue — [kə lōg′] vi. collogued, colloguing [< Fr colloque, conference < L colloquium (see COLLOQUY); sp. altered by assoc. with obs. colleague, to conspire] 1. to confer or converse privately 2. Dial. to intrigue or conspire …   English World dictionary

  • collogue — /keuh lohg /, v.i., collogued, colloguing. Dial. 1. to confer secretly. 2. to plot mischief; conspire. [1595 1605; perh. b. COLLUDE and DIALOGUE] * * * …   Universalium

  • collogue — v. plot mischief; conspire; confer secretly …   English contemporary dictionary

  • collogue — [kɒ ləʊg] verb (collogues, colloguing, collogued) archaic talk confidentially. Origin C17: prob. an alt. of obs. colleague conspire , by assoc. with L. colloqui to converse …   English new terms dictionary

  • collogue — col·logue …   English syllables

  • collogue — v.intr. (collogues, collogued, colloguing) (foll. by with) talk confidentially. Etymology: prob. alt. of obs. colleague conspire, by assoc. with L colloqui converse …   Useful english dictionary

  • Dick Hensold — (born 16 March 1959) is an American folk musician based in the state of Minnesota. An active promoter of bagpipes, he plays Northumbrian smallpipes, Swedish pipes (säckpipa), Medieval great pipes, reel pipes, Montgomery smallpipes, Great Highland …   Wikipedia

  • William Dixon (piper) — The William Dixon manuscript, written down between 1733 and 1738 in Northumberland, is the oldest known manuscript of pipe music from the British Isles, and the most important source of music for the Border Pipes. It is located in the A.K. Bell… …   Wikipedia

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