noun Etymology: perhaps from cock, adjective, (male) + horse Date: circa 1541 rocking horse

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cockhorse — Cock horse , a. 1. Lifted up, as one is on a tall horse. [1913 Webster] 2. Lofty in feeling; exultant; proud; upstart. [1913 Webster] Our painted fools and cockhorse peasantry. Marlowe. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cockhorse — Cock horse , n. 1. A child s rocking horse. [1913 Webster] Ride a cockhorse to Banbury cross. Mother Goose. [1913 Webster] 2. A high or tall horse. [R.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cockhorse — [käk′hôrs΄, käk΄hôrs′] n. [16th c., toy horse] 1. ROCKING HORSE 2. HOBBYHORSE (sense 2) …   English World dictionary

  • cockhorse — noun anything used as a toy horse (such as a rocking horse or one knee of an adult) • Hypernyms: ↑plaything, ↑toy * * * I. ˈ ̷ ̷| ̷ ̷ noun Etymology: perhaps from cock (II) + horse 1 …   Useful english dictionary

  • cockhorse — /kɒkˈhɔs/ (say kok haws) noun 1. a child s rocking horse or hobbyhorse. –phrase 2. ride a cockhorse, to be jubilant. {cock2 + horse; originally from a cocked leg on which the child rides} …   Australian English dictionary

  • cockhorse — /kok hawrs /, n. a child s rocking horse or hobbyhorse. [1530 40; orig. father s leg, astride which child rides, from COCK1 in sense projection + HORSE] * * * …   Universalium

  • cockhorse — n. hobby horse, rocking horse …   English contemporary dictionary

  • cockhorse — noun (C) old use a hobbyhorse …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • cockhorse — cock•horse [[t]ˈkɒkˌhɔrs[/t]] n. a rocking horse • Etymology: 1530–40 …   From formal English to slang

  • Coach (carriage) — The Gold State Coach of the British monarch A coach was originally a large, usually closed, four wheeled carriage with two or more horses harnessed as a team, controlled by a coachman and/or one or more postilions. It had doors in the sides, with …   Wikipedia

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