coat of arms
Etymology: Middle English cote of armes, translation of Middle French cote d'armes Date: 14th century 1. a tabard or surcoat embroidered with armorial bearings 2. a. heraldic bearings (as of a person) usually depicted on an escutcheon often with accompanying adjuncts (as a crest, motto, and supporters) b. a similar symbolic emblem

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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