closure
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin clausura, from clausus, past participle of claudere to close — more at close Date: 14th century 1. archaic means of enclosing ; enclosure 2. an act of closing ; the condition of being closed <
closure of the eyelids
>
<
business closures
>
3. something that closes <
pocket with zipper closure
>
4. [translation of French clôture] cloture 5. the property that a number system or a set has when it is mathematically closed under an operation 6. a set that consists of a given set together with all the limit points of that set 7. an often comforting or satisfying sense of finality <
victims needing closure
>
; also something (as a satisfying ending) that provides such a sense

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • closure — clo‧sure [ˈkləʊʒə ǁ ˈkloʊʒər] noun [countable] the act of closing a factory, store, organization etc permanently: • The factory faces closure if no more money can be found. • The company s 50 high street stores are currently threatened with… …   Financial and business terms

  • Closure — Видеоаль …   Википедия

  • Closure — Clo sure (kl[=o] zh[ u]r; 135), n. [Of. closure, L. clausura, fr. clauedere to shut. See {Close}, v. t.] 1. The act of shutting; a closing; as, the closure of a chink. [1913 Webster] 2. That which closes or shuts; that by which separate parts are …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • closure — late 14c., a barrier, a fence, from O.Fr. closure enclosure; that which encloses, fastening, hedge, wall, fence, also closture barrier, division; enclosure, hedge, fence, wall (12c., Mod.Fr. clôture), from L. clausura lock, fortress, a closing… …   Etymology dictionary

  • closure — [n1] conclusion cease, cessation, close, closing, desistance, end, ending, finish, stop, stoppage, termination; concept 119 Ant. beginning, introduction, opening, start closure [n2] plug, seal blockade, bolt, bung, cap, cork, fastener, latch, lid …   New thesaurus

  • closure — index cessation (termination), close (conclusion), cloture, conclusion (outcome), denouement, end …   Law dictionary

  • closure — ► NOUN 1) an act or process of closing. 2) a device that closes or seals. 3) (in a legislative assembly) a procedure for ending a debate and taking a vote. ORIGIN Latin clausura, from claudere to close …   English terms dictionary

  • closure — [klō′zhər] n. [OFr < L clausura, a closing < pp. of claudere, to CLOSE2] 1. a closing or being closed 2. a finish; end; conclusion 3. the feeling that one s prolonged state of emotional distress over some traumatic experience or situation… …   English World dictionary

  • closure — noun 1 closing of road, factory, etc. ADJECTIVE ▪ complete, total ▪ The accident caused the complete closure of the road. ▪ partial ▪ immediate ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

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