noun Etymology: German Klerisei clergy, from Medieval Latin clericia, from Late Latin clericus cleric Date: 1818 intelligentsia

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Clerisy — Cler i*sy, n. [LL. clericia. See {Clergy}.] 1. The literati, or well educated class. [1913 Webster] 2. The clergy, or their opinions, as opposed to the laity. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • clerisy — [kler′i sē] n. [ME clericia < LL(Ec) clericus: see CLERK] educated people as a class …   English World dictionary

  • clerisy — /kler euh see/, n. learned persons as a class; literati; intelligentsia. [1818; < G Klerisei clergy < ML clericia, equiv. to cleric(us) CLERIC + ia IA; introduced by S.T. Coleridge] * * * …   Universalium

  • clerisy — noun /ˈklɛrɪsi/ An elite group of intellectuals; learned people, the literati. Syn: intelligentsia …   Wiktionary

  • clerisy — n. status of intellectuals and highly educated people …   English contemporary dictionary

  • clerisy — [ klɛrɪsi] noun [usu. treated as plural] learned or literary people regarded as a social group. Origin C19: appar. influenced by Ger. Klerisei, based on Gk klēros (see cleric) …   English new terms dictionary

  • clerisy — cler·i·sy …   English syllables

  • clerisy — cler•i•sy [[t]ˈklɛr ə si[/t]] n. literati; intelligentsia • Etymology: 1818 (S.T. Coleridge); < G Klerisei clergy < ML clēricia < LL clēric(us) cleric …   From formal English to slang

  • clerisy — The wise and intelligent upper class …   Grandiloquent dictionary

  • clerisy — /ˈklɛrəsi/ (say kleruhsee) noun learned people; the literati. {Medieval Latin clēricia} …   Australian English dictionary

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