perichondral
adjective see perichondrium

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Perichondral — is the layer of fibrous connective tissue that envelopes cartilages (other than at the joints) …   Wikipedia

  • perichondral — peri·chon·dral .per ə kän drəl adj relating to, formed by, or being ossification that occurs peripherally beneath the perichondrium of a cartilage compare ENDOCHONDRAL, INTRAMEMBRANOUS (1) …   Medical dictionary

  • perichondral — peri·chon·dral …   English syllables

  • perichondral — |perə|kändrəl adjective Etymology: peri + chondr + al : occurring about or surrounding cartilage used chiefly of bone and bone formation occurring peripherally beneath the perichondrium of a cartilage; compare endochondral …   Useful english dictionary

  • perichondral bone — formed from an ossification starting at the perichondrium of a cartilage and rapidly extending internally. Also called chondral or endochondral bones …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • perichondral, perichondrial — Relating to the perichondrium …   Medical dictionary

  • perichondral ossification — ossification that occurs in a layered manner beneath the perichondrium or, later, the periosteum …   Medical dictionary

  • perichondrium — perichondral, perichondrial, adj. /per i kon dree euhm/, n., pl. perichondria / dree euh/. Anat. the membrane of fibrous connective tissue covering the surface of cartilages except at the joints. [1735 45; < NL < Gk peri PERI + chondríon, dim. of …   Universalium

  • Bone — is the substance that forms the skeleton of the body. It is composed chiefly of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate. It also serves as a storage area for calcium, playing a large role in calcium balance in the blood. The 206 bones in the body …   Medical dictionary

  • perichondrium — noun (plural perichondria) Etymology: New Latin, from peri + Greek chondros grain, cartilage Date: 1741 the membrane of fibrous connective tissue that invests cartilage except at joints • perichondral adjective …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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