desiderative
adjective see desiderate

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Desiderative — De*sid er*a*tive, a. [L. desiderativus.] Denoting desire; as, desiderative verbs. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Desiderative — De*sid er*a*tive, n. 1. An object of desire. [1913 Webster] 2. (Gram.) A verb formed from another verb by a change of termination, and expressing the desire of doing that which is indicated by the primitive verb. [1913 Webster] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • desiderative — /di sid euhr euh tiv, euh ray tiv/, adj. 1. having or expressing desire. 2. Gram. (of a verb derived from another verb) expressing desire to perform the action denoted by the underlying verb, as Sanskrit pi patis ati he wishes to fly from pát ati …   Universalium

  • desiderative — /dəˈzɪdərətɪv/ (say duh ziduhruhtiv) adjective 1. having or expressing desire. 2. Grammar (of a verb derived from another) expressing desire to perform the action denoted by the underlying verb. For example, Sanskrit véda, he knows; vi vid is ati …   Australian English dictionary

  • desiderative — adj. & n. adj. 1 Gram. (of a verb, conjugation, etc.) formed from another verb etc. and denoting a desire to perform the action of that verb etc. 2 desiring. n. Gram. a desiderative verb, conjugation, etc. Etymology: LL desiderativus (as… …   Useful english dictionary

  • desiderative — См. desiderativo …   Пятиязычный словарь лингвистических терминов

  • desiderative — noun A verbal mood that has the meaning of wanting to X , found in languages such as Sanskrit …   Wiktionary

  • desiderative — de·sid·er·a·tive …   English syllables

  • Desiderative mood — In linguistics, a desiderative (abbreviated desi or des) form is one that has the meaning of wanting to X . Desiderative forms are often verbs, derived from a more basic verb through a process of morphological derivation. Contents 1 Sanskrit 2… …   Wikipedia

  • Irrealis mood — Irrealis moods (abbreviated irr) are the main set of grammatical moods that indicate that a certain situation or action is not known to have happened as the speaker is talking. Every language has a formula for the unreal. The Indian languages of… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”