extent of damage


extent of damage
The visible plan area of damage to a target element, usually expressed in units of 1,000 square feet, in detailed damage analysis and in approximate percentages in immediate-type damage assessment reports; e.g., 50 percent structural damage.

Military dictionary. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • damage — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 harm/injury ADJECTIVE ▪ considerable, enormous, great, heavy, massive, serious, severe, significant, substantial, untold …   Collocations dictionary

  • extent — ex|tent W1S2 [ıkˈstent] n [Date: 1500 1600; : Anglo French; Origin: extente, from Latin extendere; EXTEND] 1.) to ... extent used to say how true something is or how great an effect or change is to a certain extent/to some extent/to an extent… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • extent — ex|tent [ ık stent ] noun *** 1. ) uncount the importance of a problem or situation: extent of: We were shocked by the extent of the damage. The government underestimated the extent of the contamination. the full/true extent: Doctors still do not …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • extent */*/*/ — UK [ɪkˈstent] / US noun 1) [uncountable] the size and importance of a problem or situation extent of: We were shocked by the extent of the damage. The government underestimated the extent of the contamination. the full/true extent: Doctors still… …   English dictionary

  • extent*/*/*/ — [ɪkˈstent] noun 1) [singular/U] the degree to which something happens, or the degree to which something is affected They were shocked at the extent of the damage.[/ex] Languages vary in the extent to which they rely on word order.[/ex] 2) [U] the …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • Brain damage — Brain damage, or acquired brain injury, is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells.CausesBrain damage may occur due to a wide range of conditions, illnesses, injuries, and as a result of iatrogenesis. Possible causes of widespread (… …   Wikipedia

  • Criminal damage in English law — A smashed shop window – photographed on 7 May 2005 In English law, causing criminal damage was originally a common law offence. The offence was largely concerned with the protection of dwellings and the food supply, and few sanctions were imposed …   Wikipedia

  • Malicious Damage Act 1861 — The Malicious Damage Act 1861[1] Parliament of the United Kingdom Long title An Act to consolidate and amend the Statute Law of England and Ireland relat …   Wikipedia

  • Articular cartilage damage — Cartilage structures and functions can be damaged. Such damage can result from a variety of causes, resulting from a bad fall or sport accident (traumatic), previous knee injuries (post traumatic) or wear and tear over time. Immobilisation for… …   Wikipedia

  • Institutional damage — is broadly defined as unintended consequences to an individual resulting from interaction with an institution which has responsibility for his or her care. The individual might be a hospital patient, a child in a school, or a prison inmate. Some… …   Wikipedia


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