ISO/IEC 8859-1

ISO 8859-1, more formally cited as ISO/IEC 8859-1 is part 1 of ISO/IEC 8859, a standard character encoding of the Latin alphabet. It is less formally referred to as Latin-1. It was originally developed by the ISO, but later jointly maintained by the ISO and the IEC. The standard, when supplemented with additional character assignments (in the "C0" and "C1" ranges: 0x00 to 0x1F and 0x7F, and 0x80 to 0x9F), is the basis of two widely-used character maps known as ISO-8859-1 ("note the extra hyphen") and Windows-1252.

In June 2004, the ISO/IEC working group responsible for maintaining eight-bit coded character sets disbanded and ceased all maintenance of ISO 8859, including ISO 8859-1, in order to concentrate on the Universal Character Set and Unicode. In computing applications, encodings that provide full UCS support (such as UTF-8 and UTF-16) are finding increasing favor over encodings based on ISO 8859-1.Fact|date=June 2008

Coverage

ISO 8859-1 encodes what it refers to as "Latin alphabet no. 1," consisting of 191 characters from the Latin script. This character encoding is used throughout The Americas, Western Europe, Oceania, and much of Africa. It is also commonly used in most standard romanizations of East-Asian languages.

Each character is encoded as a single eight-bit code value. These code values can be used in almost any data interchange system to communicate in the following European languages (with a few exceptions due to missing characters, as noted):

; Modern languages with complete coverage of their alphabet:] |125
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|007E|~|126
chset-color-undef
-!chset-left|8
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
-!chset-left|9
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
chset-color-undef
-!chset-left|A
chset-color-punct|chset-ctrl3|00A0|NBSP|160
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A1|¡|161
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A2|¢|162
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A3|£|163
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A4|¤|164
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A5|¥|165
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A6|¦|166
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A7|§|167
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A8|¨|168
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A9|©|169
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AA|ª|170
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AB|«|171
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AC|¬|172
chset-color-punct|chset-ctrl3|00AD|SHY|173
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AE|®|174
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AF|¯|175
-!chset-left|B
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B0|°|176
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B1|±|177
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B2|²|178
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B3|³|179
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B4|´|180
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B5|µ|181
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B6||182
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B7|·|183
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B8|¸|184
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B9|¹|185
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BA|º|186
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BB|»|187
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BC|¼|188
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BD|½|189
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BE|¾|190
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BF|¿|191
-!chset-left|C
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C0|À|192
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C1|Á|193
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C2|Â|194
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C3|Ã|195
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C4|Ä|196
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C5|Å|197
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C6|Æ|198
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C7|Ç|199
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C8|È|200
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C9|É|201
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CA|Ê|202
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CB|Ë|203
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CC|Ì|204
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CD|Í|205
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CE|Î|206
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CF|Ï|207
-!chset-left|D
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D0|Ð|208
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D1|Ñ|209
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D2|Ò|210
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D3|Ó|211
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D4|Ô|212
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D5|Õ|213
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D6|Ö|214
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00D7|×|215
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D8|Ø|216
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D9|Ù|217
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DA|Ú|218
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DB|Û|219
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DC|Ü|220
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DD|Ý|221
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DE|Þ|222
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DF|ß|223
-!chset-left|E
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E0|à|224
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E1|á|225
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E2|â|226
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E3|ã|227
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E4|ä|228
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E5|å|229
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E6|æ|230
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E7|ç|231
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E8|è|232
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E9|é|233
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EA|ê|234
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EB|ë|235
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EC|ì|236
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00ED|í|237
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EE|î|238
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EF|ï|239
-!chset-left|F
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F0|ð|240
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F1|ñ|241
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F2|ò|242
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F3|ó|243
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F4|ô|244
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F5|õ|245
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F6|ö|246
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00F7|÷|247
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F8|ø|248
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F9|ù|249
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FA|ú|250
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FB|û|251
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FC|ü|252
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FD|ý|253
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FE|þ|254
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FF|ÿ|255

Code values 00–1F, 7F–9F are not assigned to characters by ISO/IEC 8859-1.

The lower range 20 to 7E (the G0 subset) maps exactly to the same coded G0 subset of the ISO 646 US variant (commonly known as ASCII), whose ISO 2022 standard switch sequence is "ESC ( B". The higher range A0 to FF (the G1 subset) maps exactly to the same subset initiated by the ISO 2022 standard switch sequence "ESC . A".

Related character maps

The ISO/IEC 8859-1 standard has long been the basis of a number of "character maps", also known as "character sets", "charsets", or "code pages", the most popular being ISO-8859-1 (note the extra hyphen) and Windows-1252. Both of these maps are a superset of ISO/IEC 8859-1; they supplement the standard's 191 character assignments by mapping additional characters to at least some portion of the code value ranges 00–1F, 7F, and 80–9F.

ISO-8859-1

In 1992, the IANA registered the character map ISO_8859-1:1987, more commonly known by its preferred MIME name of ISO-8859-1 (note the extra hyphen over ISO 8859-1), a superset of ISO 8859-1, for use on the Internet. This map assigns the C0 and C1 control characters to the code values 00–1F, 7F, and 80–9F. It thus provides for 256 characters via every possible 8-bit value.

ISO-8859-1 is (according to the standards at least) the default encoding of documents delivered via HTTP with a MIME type beginning with "text/". It is the default encoding of the values of certain descriptive HTTP headers, and is the standard encoding used by the X Window System on most Unix machines in locales which use that character set. It was also the basis of the repertoire of characters allowed in HTML 3.2 documents (HTML 4.0, however, is based on Unicode).

Escape sequences (from ISO/IEC 6429 or ISO/IEC 2022) are not to be interpreted in documents labeled as ISO-8859-1 encoded. As well as the canonical name and preferred MIME name mentioned above, the following other aliases are registered for ISO-8859-1: ISO_8859-1, ISO-8859-1, iso-ir-100, csISOLatin1, latin1, l1, IBM819, CP819. ISO-8859-1 was also incorporated as the first 256 code points of ISO/IEC 10646 and }

|125
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|007E|~|126
chset-color-ctrl |chset-ctrl3|007F|DEL|127
-!chset-left|8
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0080|PAD |128
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0081|HOP |129
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0082|BPH |130
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0083|NBH |131
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0084|IND |132
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0085|NEL |133
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0086|SSA |134
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0087|ESA |135
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0088|HTS |136
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0089|HTJ |137
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|008A|VTS |138
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|008B|PLD |139
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|008C|PLU |140
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|008D|RI |141
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|008E|SS2 |142
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|008F|SS3 |143
-!chset-left|9
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0090|DCS |144
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0091|PU1 |145
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0092|PU2 |146
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0093|STS |147
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0094|CCH |148
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0095|MW |149
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0096|SPA |150
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0097|EPA |151
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0098|SOS |152
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|0099|SGCI|153
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|009A|SCI |154
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|009B|CSI |155
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|009C|ST |156
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|009D|OSC |157
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|009E|PM |158
chset-color-ctrl|chset-ctrl3|009F|APC |159
-!chset-left|A
chset-color-punct|chset-ctrl3|00A0|NBSP|160
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A1|¡|161
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A2|¢|162
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A3|£|163
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A4|¤|164
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A5|¥|165
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A6|¦|166
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A7|§|167
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A8|¨|168
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00A9|©|169
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AA|ª|170
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AB|«|171
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AC|¬|172
chset-color-punct|chset-ctrl3|00AD|SHY|173
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AE|®|174
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00AF|¯|175
-!chset-left|B
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B0|°|176
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B1|±|177
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B2|²|178
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B3|³|179
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B4|´|180
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B5|µ|181
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B6||182
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B7|·|183
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B8|¸|184
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00B9|¹|185
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BA|º|186
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BB|»|187
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BC|¼|188
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BD|½|189
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BE|¾|190
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00BF|¿|191
-!chset-left|C
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C0|À|192
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C1|Á|193
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C2|Â|194
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C3|Ã|195
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C4|Ä|196
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C5|Å|197
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C6|Æ|198
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C7|Ç|199
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C8|È|200
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00C9|É|201
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CA|Ê|202
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CB|Ë|203
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CC|Ì|204
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CD|Í|205
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CE|Î|206
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00CF|Ï|207
-!chset-left|D
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D0|Ð|208
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D1|Ñ|209
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D2|Ò|210
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D3|Ó|211
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D4|Ô|212
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D5|Õ|213
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D6|Ö|214
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00D7|×|215
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D8|Ø|216
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00D9|Ù|217
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DA|Ú|218
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DB|Û|219
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DC|Ü|220
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DD|Ý|221
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DE|Þ|222
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00DF|ß|223
-!chset-left|E
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E0|à|224
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E1|á|225
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E2|â|226
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E3|ã|227
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E4|ä|228
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E5|å|229
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E6|æ|230
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E7|ç|231
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E8|è|232
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00E9|é|233
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EA|ê|234
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EB|ë|235
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EC|ì|236
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00ED|í|237
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EE|î|238
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00EF|ï|239
-!chset-left|F
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F0|ð|240
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F1|ñ|241
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F2|ò|242
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F3|ó|243
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F4|ô|244
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F5|õ|245
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F6|ö|246
chset-color-punct|chset-cell3|00F7|÷|247
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F8|ø|248
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00F9|ù|249
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FA|ú|250
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FB|û|251
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FC|ü|252
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FD|ý|253
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FE|þ|254
chset-color-intl |chset-cell3|00FF|ÿ|255

Note that most of these control characters are not made for use in portable ISO-8859-1 encoded plain text documents, but only within specific protocols or devices, except a few ones whose behavior are standardized: TAB (09), LF (0A), CR (0D) and NEL (85); all but the first one are used to encode end of lines or to separate paragraphs, and TAB is often considered equivalent to whitespace. However FF (0C) is commonly accepted in some applications interpreting plain-text documents as an additional ignorable whitespace at the beginning of lines, to mark the position of an explicit page break when printing.

However, some encodings allow using BS (08) to create additional characters by emulating the superposition of multiple characters on printing devices.

Some ISO standards assign specific functions to some controls (for example in ISO 2022) where SO (0E), SI (0F), DLE (10), ESC (1B) and SS2 (8E) are used to control the encoding of characters after them or to switch between multiple encodings.

The NUL character (00) is commonly used as a string terminator in some programming languages, or as a filler in database records that must be ignored and is not part of the encoded text. STX (02) and ETX (03) are commonly used for delimiting frames in some transmission protocols. SUB (1A) is also commonly used as a replacement character to mark errors detected in input transmission streams, and it may be rendered graphically. DC1 (11) and DC3 (13) are commonly used in the XON/XOFF protocol for controlling the transmission speed. Finally, EM (19) or EOT (04) may be used as an end-of-file marker in some text file formats.

The ISO-8859-1/Windows-1252 mixup

It is very common to mislabel text data with the charset label ISO-8859-1, even though the data are really Windows-1252 encoded. In Windows-1252, codes between 0x80 and 0x9F are used for letters and punctuation, whereas they are control codes in ISO-8859-1. Many web browsers and e-mail clients will interpret ISO-8859-1 control codes as Windows-1252 characters in order to accommodate such mislabeling but it is not a standard behaviour and care should be taken to avoid generating these characters in ISO-8859-1 labeled content.

HTML 5 requires that documents advertised as ISO-8859-1 actually use the Windows-1252 encoding. If the document uses any character with different meaning in ISO-8859-1 and Windows-1252, that is considered a parse error. [ [http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/parsing.html#character1 HTML 5 Draft Recommendation — 15 September 2008, 8.2.2.2. Character encoding requirements] , retrieved [2008-09-15] .]

Similar character sets

The Apple Macintosh computer introduced a character encoding called Mac Roman, or Mac-Roman, in 1984. It was meant to be suitable for Western European desktop publishing. It is a superset of ASCII, like ISO-8859-1, and has most of the characters that are in ISO-8859-1 but in a totally different arrangement. A later version, registered with IANA as "Macintosh", replaced the generic currency sign ¤ with the euro sign €. The few printable characters that are in ISO 8859-1 but not in this set are often a source of trouble when editing text on websites using older Macintosh browsers (including the last version of Internet Explorer for Mac). However the extra characters that Windows-1252 has in the C1 codepoint range are all supported in MacRoman and except for the few missing ISO-8859-1 characters a Macintosh can send/receive files (and email) that are encoded/marked as ISO-8859-1 (with the C1 Control Characters) and Windows-1252 by remapping the glyph's codepoint numbers.

DOS had code page 850, which had all printable characters that ISO-8859-1 had (albeit in a totally different arrangement) plus the most widely used graphics characters from code page 437.

ee also

*Latin characters in Unicode
*ISO/IEC_8859-15 - a derivative of ISO-8859-1

Notes

External links

* [http://www.iso.org/iso/en/CatalogueDetailPage.CatalogueDetail?CSNUMBER=28245&ICS1=35&ICS2=40&ICS3= ISO/IEC 8859-1:1998]
* [http://anubis.dkuug.dk/JTC1/SC2/WG3/docs/n411.pdf ISO/IEC 8859-1:1998] - 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets, Part 1: Latin alphabet No. 1 "(draft dated February 12, 1998, published April 15, 1998)"
* [http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Ecma-094.htm Standard ECMA-94] : 8-Bit Single Byte Coded Graphic Character Sets - Latin Alphabets No. 1 to No. 4 "2nd edition (June 1986)"
* [http://www.itscj.ipsj.or.jp/ISO-IR/100.pdf ISO-IR 100] Right-Hand Part of Latin Alphabet No.1 "(February 1, 1986)"
* [http://www.microsoft.com/globaldev/reference/iso.mspx Windows Code pages]
* [http://www.alanwood.net/demos/charsetdiffs.html Differences between ANSI, ISO-8859-1 and MacRoman Character Sets]
* [http://www.eki.ee/letter/ The Letter Database]
* [http://czyborra.com/charsets/iso8859.html The ISO 8859 Alphabet Soup] - Roman Czyborra's summary of ISO character sets


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  • ISO/IEC 8859-1:1998 — изд.1 E JTC 1/SC 2 Информационные технологии. 8 битовые однобайтовые наборы кодированных графических знаков. Часть 1. Латинский алфавит № 1 раздел 35.040 …   Стандарты Международной организации по стандартизации (ИСО)

  • ISO/CEI 8859-1 — ISO 8859 1 Unicode Jeux de caractères UCS (ISO/CEI 10646) ISO 646, ASCII ISO 8859 1 WGL4 UniHan Équivalences normalisées NFC (précomposée) NFD (décomposée) NFKC (compatibilité) NFKD (compatibilité) Propriétés et algorithmes ISO 15924 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • ISO/IEC 8859 — is a joint ISO and IEC standard for 8 bit character encodings for use by computers. The standard is divided into numbered, separately published parts, such as ISO/IEC 8859 1, ISO/IEC 8859 2, etc., each of which may be informally referred to as a… …   Wikipedia

  • ISO/IEC 8859-11 — ISO/IEC 8859 11:2001, Information technology 8 bit single byte coded graphic character sets Part 11: Latin/Thai alphabet, is part of the ISO/IEC 8859 series of ASCII based standard character encodings, first edition published in 2001. It is… …   Wikipedia

  • ISO/IEC 8859-6 — ISO/IEC 8859 6:1999, Information technology 8 bit single byte coded graphic character sets Part 6: Latin/Arabic alphabet, is part of the ISO/IEC 8859 series of ASCII based standard character encodings, first edition published in 1987. It is… …   Wikipedia

  • ISO/IEC 8859 — es un conjunto ISO y la IEC estándar de 8 bits para codificaciones de caracteres para su uso en computadoras. La norma se divide en los números, publicado por separado, tales como ISO/IEC 8859 1, ISO/IEC 8859 2, etc, cada uno de los cuales puede… …   Wikipedia Español

  • ISO/IEC 8859-8 — ISO 8859 8, more formally cited as ISO/IEC 8859 8 (but not as Latin 8!), is part 8 of ISO/IEC 8859, a standard character encoding defined by ISO.ISO 8859 8 contains all the Hebrew letters (no Hebrew vowel signs). ISO 8859 8:1988, more commonly… …   Wikipedia

  • ISO/IEC 8859-15 — ISO 8859 15 is part 15 of ISO 8859, a standard character encoding defined by International Organization for Standardization. It is also known as Latin 9, and unofficially as Latin 0 but not as Latin 15. It is similar to ISO 8859 1 but replaces… …   Wikipedia

  • ISO/IEC 8859-2 — ISO 8859 2, more formally cited as ISO/IEC 8859 2 or less formally as Latin 2, is part 2 of ISO/IEC 8859, a standard character encoding defined by ISO. It encodes what it refers to as Latin alphabet no. 2, consisting of 191 characters from the… …   Wikipedia

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