Emperor Ingyō

was the 19th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. [Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). "Annales des empereurs du japon," p. 26; Varley, Paul. (1980). "Jinnō Shōtōki," p. 112.] No firm dates can be assigned to this emperor's life or reign. Ingyō is considered to have ruled the country during the mid-5th century, but there is a paucity of information about him. Scholars can only lament that, at this time, there is insufficient material available for further verification and study.

According to "Kojiki" and "Nihonshoki", he was the 4th son of Emperor Nintoku and his consort Iwanohime, and therefore a younger brother of his predecessor Emperor Hanzei. He sat on the throne after Hanzei died and ruled for 41 years. His consort was Oshisaka no Ōnakatsu no Hime. They had five sons and four daughters, including Emperor Ankō and Emperor Yūryaku. He reformed the system of family and clan names, because many named themselves false names using higher ranked clan or family names.

Events of Ingyō's reign

The earliest documented earthquake in Japan occurred in 416 when the Imperial Palace at Kyoto was leveled by the severity of the earth's tremors. [Hammer, Joshua. (2006). [http://books.google.com/books?id=6O8VyhDbUPgC&printsec=frontcover&dq=yokohama+burning&sig=rbgbEDXJV5fht4wdSD1HBoAMANg#PPA62,M1 "Yokohama Burning: The Deadly 1923 Earthquake and Fire that Helped Forge the Path to World War II," p. 62.] ]

Today scholars identify him with King Sai in the Book of Song, who was a king of Japan (referred to as "Wa" by contemporary Chinese scholars) and sent messengers to the Song Dynasty at least twice, in 443 and 451.

According to Nihonshoki, the king of the Korean Silla Kingdom grieved very much when Ingyo died. To comfort the soul of Ingyo, he presented Japan 80 musicians. ["Nihonshoki", volume 13, Story of Ingyō: 允恭紀四十二年 - 於是新羅王聞天皇既崩,驚愁之,貢上調船八十艘及種種樂人八十. [http://applepig.idv.tw/kuon/furu/text/syoki/syoki13.htm#sk13_i07] ]

He is entombed in an Imperial burial mound, also known as nihongo|Emperor Ingyō's misasagi|恵我長野北陵,|"Eganonagano no kita no misasagi", in Fujiidera city near Osaka. [Gowland, William. "The Burial Mounds and Dolmens of the Early Emperors of Japan," "The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland," Vol. 37, Jan.-Jun., 1907, pp. 10-46.]

Notes

References

* Aston, William George. (1896). "Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan from the Earliest Times to A.D. 697". London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner. [reprinted by Tuttle Publishing, Tokyo, 2007. 10-ISBN 0-8048-0984-4; 13-ISBN 978-0-8048-0984-9 (paper)]
* Brown, Delmer M. and Ichirō Ishida, eds. (1979). [ Jien, c. 1220] , "Gukanshō (The Future and the Past, a translation and study of the Gukanshō, an interpretative history of Japan written in 1219)." Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-03460-0
* Hammer, Joshua. (2006). [http://books.google.com/books?id=6O8VyhDbUPgC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Tokyo+1923&lr=&source=gbs_summary_r "Yokohama Burning: The Deadly 1923 Earthquake and Fire that Helped Forge the Path to World War II."] New York: Simon & Schuster. 10-ISBN 0-743-26465-7; 13-ISBN 978-0-743-26465-5 (cloth)
* Titsingh, Isaac, ed. (1834). [Siyun-sai Rin-siyo/Hayashi Gahō, 1652] , "Nipon o daï itsi ran; ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon." Paris: Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland. [http://books.google.com/books?id=18oNAAAAIAAJ&dq=nipon+o+dai+itsi+ran ...Click link for digitized, full-text copy of this book (in French)]
* Varley, H. Paul , ed. (1980). [ Kitabatake Chikafusa, 1359] , "Jinnō Shōtōki ("A Chronicle of Gods and Sovereigns: Jinnō Shōtōki of Kitabatake Chikafusa" translated by H. Paul Varley)." New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-04940-4

ee also

* Emperor of Japan
* List of Emperors of Japan
* Imperial cult

External links

* http://gias.snu.ac.kr/wthong/publication/paekche/eng/hi5-6.pdf




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