Freedom of assembly


Freedom of assembly

Freedom of assembly, sometimes used interchangeably with the freedom of association, is the individual right to come together with other individuals and collectively express, promote, pursue and defend common interests. [Jeremy McBride, Freedom of Association, in The Essentials of... Human Rights, Hodder Arnold, London, 2005, pg.18-20] The right to freedom of association is recognised as human right, political freedom and a civil liberty.

Freedom of assembly and freedom of association may be used to distinguish between the freedom to assemble in public places and the freedom of joining an association. Freedom of assembly is often used in the context of the right to protest, while freedom of association is used in the context of labour rights and the right to collective bargaining, for example by joining a trade union. Freedom of assembly as guaranteed in the Canadian Constitution and the Constitution of the United States are interpreted to mean both the freedom to assemble and the freedom to join an association. [ [http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/fr/freedom+of+assembly.html Freedom Of Assembly ] ]

Freedom of Assembly in International Human Rights Law

In international human rights law the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights recognizes the right to freedom of assembly as the right to assemble (Article 21) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights recognises the right to freedom of association as the rights to join trade unions (Article 8) as recognised in the International Labour Organisation Convention of 1948 concerning "Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organize". Similarly, the American Convention on Human Rights recognises the right to freedom of Assembly in the context of assembling, and the freedom of association in the context of associating, but extends the context from trade unions to "the right to associate freely for ideological, religious, political, economic, labor, social, cultural, sports, or other purposes." (Article 16) Freedom of assembly is closely linked to the right to freedom of speech. Like freedom of speech, freedom of assembly is subject to limitations, for example the American Convention on Human Rights recognises the "The right of peaceful assembly, without arms" (Article 15) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights states that "No restrictions may be placed on the exercise of this right other than those imposed in conformity with the law and which are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security or public safety, public order, the protection of public health or morals or the protection of the rights and freedoms of others." (Article 21)

Human Rights Instruments

The freedom of assembly is enshrined in the following human rights instruments:
* Universal Declaration of Human Rights - Article 20
* International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights - Article 21
* European Convention of Human Rights - Article 11
* American Convention on Human Rights - Article 15

Constitutions

Examples of the national constitutions recognising the freedom of assembly are:
* Canada - Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms which is Part I of the Constitution of Canada
* France - article 431-1 of the "Nouveau Code Pénal"
* Hong Kong - Basic Law Section 27
*
* Republic of Ireland - Guaranteed by Article 40.6.1 of the Constitution of Ireland
* Turkey - article 33 and 34 of the Constitution of Turkey guarantee the freedom of association and assembly.
* United States - First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States

Notes

ee also

* [http://www.osce.org/item/23835.html OSCE-ODIHR Guidelines on Freedom of Peaceful Assembly]
*Freedom of assembly in Russia
*Free speech zone


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • freedom of assembly — See assembly. Collins dictionary of law. W. J. Stewart. 2001 …   Law dictionary

  • freedom of assembly — noun the right to peaceably assemble and to petition the government for redress of grievances; guaranteed by the First Amendment to the US Constitution • Topics: ↑law, ↑jurisprudence • Hypernyms: ↑civil right * * * ˌfreedom of asˈsembly 7… …   Useful english dictionary

  • freedom of assembly — n [U] the right to have public meetings. This right became part of US law under the First Amendment. In Britain, people are generally free to have public meetings and this feedom is now protected by European Convention on European Rights. * * * …   Universalium

  • freedom of assembly — noun The right of citizens of the United States to freely congregate or assemble anywhere should they wish to …   Wiktionary

  • Freedom of assembly in Russia — Freedom of assembly in the Russian Federation is granted by Art. 31 of the Constitution adopted in 1993: Citizens of the Russian Federation shall have the right to gather peacefully, without weapons, and to hold meetings, rallies, demonstrations …   Wikipedia

  • Freedom of association — is the individual right to come together with other individuals and collectively express, promote, pursue and defend common interests.Jeremy McBride, Foredoom of Association, The Essentials of Human Rights, Hodder Arnold, London, 2005, pg.18] The …   Wikipedia

  • Assembly — may refer to:Biology* Sequence assembly * Genome assembly * Neuronal assembly and Cell assembly theoryPolitics* Deliberative assembly ** General Assembly ** House of Assembly ** Legislative Assembly ** Roman assemblies ** National Assembly **… …   Wikipedia

  • freedom — free·dom n 1: the quality or state of being free: as a: the absence of necessity, coercion, or constraint in choice or action b: liberation from slavery or restraint or from the power of another c: the quality or state of being exempt or released …   Law dictionary

  • assembly — as·sem·bly n pl blies 1 a: a company of persons collected together in one place usu. for some common purpose b cap: a legislative body esp. that makes up the lower house of a legislature see also general assembly …   Law dictionary

  • Freedom of movement — This article is about the right to travel. For the mechanical concept, see Range of motion. Part of a series on Freedom …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.