Transport in Burkina Faso

Transport in Burkina Faso

This article concerns the systems of transport in Burkina Faso, which primarily include road and rail infrastructure.

Railways

There are 622 kilometres of railway in Burkina Faso, of which 517 km run from Ouagadougou to Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire; and 105 km from Ouagadougou to Kaya. All of the railways in the country are of the narrow 1 metre gauge. Only one adjacent country is connected to Burkina Faso via rail, Côte d'Ivoire, a country in which the same one-metre gauge is employed.

A rail link connects Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso with the port of Abidjan in Côte d'Ivoire: the line from Ouagadougou to the Nigerien capital Niamey stops at Kaya. Instability in Côte D'Ivoire in 2003 forced a rerouting of rail freight from the Abidjan corridor to ports in Togo, Benin, and Ghana via the road network. A proposed rail link between Ouagadougou and in Burkina Faso and Kumassi and Bonakra in Ghana, has been discussed with Ghanaian officials, and feasibility studies are being undertaken to explore this possibility, which would provide rail access to the inland port of Bonakra. Burkina Faso and Ghana use different rail gauges.

In 2006, an Indian proposal surfaced to link the railways in Benin and Togo with landlocked Niger and Burkino Faso. Additionally, a Czech proposal also surfaced to link Ghana railways with Burkina Faso. [ [http://www.otal.com/ghana/transportnews.htm OTAL - Ghana ] ] . The manganese deposits near Dori are one source of traffic. Burkina Faso would also be a participant in the AfricaRail project.

Stations served

Existing

The following towns of Burkina Faso are served by the country's railways:
* Banfora
* Bobo-Dioulasso
* Koudougou
* Ouagadougou - national capital
* Kaya - terminus

Highways

There is a total of 12,506 kilometres of highway in Burkina Faso, of which 2,001 kilometres are paved.

In 2000, the Government of Burkina Faso classified 15,000 kilometers of road as part of the national road network managed under the Ministry of Infrastructures Transport and Housing (MITH) through the Directorate of Roads (DGR). This network includes main inter-city roads and access roads for départments' capital cities. Only ten of the network's main roads are even partially paved, and the paved roads are plagued by dangerous potholes, missing signage, missing barriers and guardrails near roadside hazards, and no pavement markings to separate traffic moving in opposite directions.

References

External links

* [http://www.un.org/Depts/Cartographic/map/profile/burkina.pdf UN Map of Burkina Faso]


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Burkina Faso — (browse) …   Wikipedia

  • Burkina Faso — Burkina Faso …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Burkina-Faso — (fr) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • BURKINA FASO — Ancien territoire de l’Afrique Occidentale française, la république de Haute Volta a accédé à l’indépendance en 1960; elle est devenue, depuis le 4 août 1984, le Burkina Faso («la patrie des hommes intègres»). Situé au sud de la boucle du Niger,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Burkina Faso — /beuhr kee neuh fah soh/ a republic in W Africa: formerly part of French West Africa. 10,891,159; 106,111 sq. mi. (274,827 sq. km). Cap.: Ouagadougou. Formerly, Upper Volta. * * * Burkina Faso Introduction Burkina Faso Background: Independence… …   Universalium

  • Burkina Faso — 12° 16′ 00″ N 2° 04′ 00″ W / 12.2667, 2.06667 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Burkina Faso — <p></p> <p></p> Introduction ::Burkina Faso <p></p> Background: <p></p> Burkina Faso (formerly Upper Volta) achieved independence from France in 1960. Repeated military coups during the 1970s and… …   The World Factbook

  • Outline of Burkina Faso — The …   Wikipedia

  • Constitution of Burkina Faso — Burkina Faso This article is part of the series: Politics and government of Burkina Faso Constitution Pr …   Wikipedia

  • Military of Burkina Faso — Service branches Army Air Force National Gendarmerie National Police People s Militia Leadership Minister of Defense Yero Boly Manpower …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.