Bernice Johnson Reagon


Bernice Johnson Reagon
Bernice Johnson Reagon
Background information
Birth name Bernice Johnson
Born October 4, 1942 (1942-10-04) (age 69)
Origin Dougherty County, Georgia
United States
Genres A cappella
Occupations singer, songwriter, scholar
Instruments vocals
Years active 1966–present
Associated acts Sweet Honey in the Rock, Toshi Reagon
Website bernicejohnsonreagon.com

Bernice Johnson Reagon (born October 4, 1942) is a singer, composer, scholar, and social activist, who founded the a cappella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock in 1973.

Contents

Early life and education

The daughter of Baptist minister J.J. Johnson, Bernice was born and raised in southwest Georgia, where music was an integral part of life. She entered Albany State College in 1959 (since July 1996 Albany State University) where she studied music.

Career

Activism

Reagon was an active participant in the Black Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s as a member of The Freedom Singers, organized by the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Music

Reagon is a specialist in African-American oral history, performance and protest traditions. She was featured in 1992 in the Emmy-nominated PBS documentary The Songs Are Free: Bernice Johnson Reagon with Bill Moyers. She has served as music consultant, producer, composer, and performer on several award-winning film projects and was the conceptual producer and narrator of the Peabody Award-winning radio series, Wade in the Water, African American Sacred Music Traditions.

Reagon's work as a scholar and composer is reflected in publications on African American culture and history, including: a collection of essays entitled If You Don’t Go, Don’t Hinder Me: The African American Sacred Song Tradition (University of Nebraska Press, 2001); We Who Believe In Freedom: Sweet Honey In The Rock: Still on the Journey, (Anchor Books, 1993); and We'll Understand It Better By And By: Pioneering African American Gospel Composers (Smithsonian Press, 1992).

Reagon has recorded on several albums on Folkways Records including "Folk Songs: The South," "Wade in the Water," and "Lest We Forget, Vol. 3: Sing for Freedom."[1]

Reagon is Professor Emerita of History at American University in Washington, D.C., and holds the title of Curator Emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, DC, and was the 2002-04 Cosby Chair Professor of Fine Arts at Spelman College in Atlanta Georgia.

Quote

"Life's challenges are not supposed to paralyze you, they're supposed to help you discover who you are." -- Bernice Johnson Reagon

Honors

In 1995 Reagon received a Charles Frankel Prize for her contributions to the public understanding of the humanities. The award was presented at the White House by President Bill Clinton. Other notable awards include the 9th Annual Heinz Award in the Arts and Humanities given in 2003 by the Heinz Family Foundation.[2] In April 2009 Reagon honorary doctoral degree from the Berklee College of Music.

Family

In 1963 she married Cordell Reagon, another member of The Freedom Singers.[3] Her daughter, Toshi Reagon, is also a singer-songwriter.

References

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Reagon, Bernice Johnson — ▪ American musician and historian née  Bernice Johnson  born Oct. 4, 1942, Albany, Ga., U.S.       African American musician and historian whose work ranged from African spirituals to militant civil rights anthems.       Reagon grew up surrounded …   Universalium

  • Toshi Reagon — (born in Atlanta in 1964) is an American folk/blues musician. She is the daughter of Sweet Honey in the Rock co founder Bernice Johnson Reagon, with whom she has sometimes collaborated on musical projects. Reagon began performing when she dropped …   Wikipedia

  • Cordell Reagon — Cordell Hull Reagon (February 22, 1943 – November 12, 1996) was an American singer. He was the founding member of the Freedom Singers of the Student Non Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and a leader of the Albany Movement during the 1960s… …   Wikipedia

  • The Freedom Singers — were founded in 1962 by Cordell Reagon, Bernice Johnson (Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon), Charles Neblett and Rutha Mae Harris. During the early 1960s the Freedom Singers, from Albany, performed throughout the country to raise funds for the Student… …   Wikipedia

  • Sweet Honey in the Rock — Infobox Musical artist Name = Sweet Honey in the Rock Img capt = Img size = Landscape = Background = group or band Alias = Origin = Genre = Gospel Years active = Start date|1973 Present Label = Associated acts = URL = Current members = Ysaye… …   Wikipedia

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  • Sweet Honey in the Rock — ist ein afro amerikanisches weibliches A cappella Gesangsensemble. Die Gruppe wurde 1973 von Bernice Johnson Reagon (* 1942) zusammen mit Carol Maillard, Louise Robinson und Mie in Washington D.C. aus Mitgliedern der D. C. Black Repertory Theater …   Deutsch Wikipedia


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