epimorphosis
Pattern of regeneration in which proliferation precedes the development of a new part. Opposite of morphallaxis.

Dictionary of molecular biology. 2004.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • epimorphosis — n. [Gr. epi, upon; morphosis, form] 1. With the same form in successive stages of growth; see anamorphosis, metamorphosis. 2. Larval forms which are suppressed or passed before hatching, emerging as the adult body form. 3. (ANNELIDA: Oligochaeta) …   Dictionary of invertebrate zoology

  • epimorphosis — epimorphic, adj. /ep euh mawr feuh sis, mawr foh /, n. Zool. a form of development in segmented animals in which body segmentation is completed before hatching. [EPI + MORPHOSIS] * * * …   Universalium

  • epimorphosis — Regeneration of a part of an organism by growth at the cut surface. [epi + G. morphe, shape] * * * epi·mor·pho·sis .ep ə mȯr fə səs n, pl pho·ses .sēz regeneration of a part or organism involving extensive cell proliferation followed by… …   Medical dictionary

  • epimorphosis — n. form of development, manner of development (Zoology) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • epimorphosis — ep·i·mor·pho·sis …   English syllables

  • epimorphosis — /ˌɛpimɔˈfoʊsəs/ (say .epeemaw fohsuhs) noun a form of development in segmented animals in which body segmentation is completed before hatching. {epi + morphosis} …   Australian English dictionary

  • epimorphosis — ˌepəˈmȯrfəsə̇s sometimes ˌmȯrˈfōs noun Etymology: New Latin, from epi + morphosis 1. : regeneration of a part or organism involving extensive cell proliferation followed by differentiation compare morphallaxis 2. : development without… …   Useful english dictionary

  • epimorphic regeneration — epimorphosis …   Medical dictionary

  • Echinoderm — Temporal range: Cambrian–recent …   Wikipedia

  • Morphallaxis — is the regeneration of specific tissue in a variety of organisms due to loss or death of the existing tissue. The word comes from the Greek allakt, which means to exchange. The classical example of morphallaxis is that of the Cnidarian hydra,… …   Wikipedia

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