heteromerous
adj. [Gr. heteros, different; meros, part]
1. Nonuniformity in number of parts between organisms of the same species, or organs on the same individual; see homeomerous.
2. (ARTHROPODA: Insecta)
In Coleoptera, the tarsi are usually 5,5,4 segments in both sexes, occasionally 4,4,4, and rarely 3,4,4 in males, very rarely 3,3,3.

Online Dictionary of Invertebrate Zoology. . 2005.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Heteromerous — Het er*om er*ous, a. [See {Heteromera}.] 1. (Chem & Crystallog.) Unrelated in chemical composition, though similar or indentical in certain other respects; as, borax and augite are hom[oe]morphous, but heteromerous. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) With… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • heteromerous — [het΄ər äm′ər əs] adj. [ HETERO + MEROUS] Bot. having a whorl or whorls with a different number of parts from that of the other whorls …   English World dictionary

  • heteromerous — /het euh rom euhr euhs/, adj. having or consisting of parts that differ in quality, number of elements, or the like: a heteromerous flower. [1820 30; HETERO + MEROUS] * * * …   Universalium

  • heteromerous — /hɛtəˈrɒmərəs/ (say hetuh romuhruhs) adjective having or consisting of parts which differ in quality, number of elements, or the like: a heteromerous flower. {hetero + mer(e) + ous} …   Australian English dictionary

  • heteromerous — adjective Having different types or numbers of parts (within the same or similar structure) …   Wiktionary

  • heteromerous — SYN: heteromeric (2). * * * het·er·om·er·ous (het″ər omґər əs) heteromeric …   Medical dictionary

  • heteromerous — adj. composed of differing parts …   English contemporary dictionary

  • heteromerous — [ˌhɛtə rɒm(ə)rəs] adjective Biology having or composed of parts that differ in number or position …   English new terms dictionary

  • heteromerous — het·er·om·er·ous …   English syllables

  • heteromerous — het•er•om•er•ous [[t]ˌhɛt əˈrɒm ər əs[/t]] adj. bio bio having parts that differ in quality, number of elements, or the like • Etymology: 1820–30 …   From formal English to slang

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”