biometer


biometer
n. [Gr. bios, life; metron, measure]
An indicator organism that determines climate and condition acceptability.

Online Dictionary of Invertebrate Zoology. . 2005.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • biometer — /buy om i teuhr/, n. an instrument for measuring the amount of carbon dioxide given off by an organism, tissue, etc. [1860 65; BIO + METER] * * * …   Universalium

  • biometer — noun A device that is used to detect the presence of life by detecting and measuring minute amounts of evolved carbon dioxide …   Wiktionary

  • biometer — A device for measuring carbon dioxide given off by organisms and, hence, for determining the quantity of living matter present. [bio + G. metron, measure] * * * bi·om·e·ter bī äm ət ər n a device for measuring carbon dioxide given off by living… …   Medical dictionary

  • biometer — n. device for measuring the amount of carbon dioxide given off by an organism …   English contemporary dictionary

  • biometer — bi·om·e·ter …   English syllables

  • biometer — bi•om•e•ter [[t]baɪˈɒm ɪ tər[/t]] n. lab an instrument for measuring the amount of carbon dioxide given off by an organism, tissue, etc • Etymology: 1860–65 …   From formal English to slang

  • biometer — bīˈäməd.ə(r) noun ( s) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary bi (II) + meter : a device for measuring carbon dioxide given off by living matter * * * /buy om i teuhr/, n. an instrument for measuring the amount of carbon dioxide given off …   Useful english dictionary

  • Bovis scale — The Bovis scale, allegedly named after a French radiesthesist called either Antoine or Alfred Bovis (1871 1947), is a concept used by dowsers and adherents of geomancy to quantify the strength of a postulated cosmo telluric energy inherent in a… …   Wikipedia

  • Peter Ihm — (* 29. Dezember 1926 in Waldkirch) ist ein deutscher Bioinformatiker und war ab 1966 Professor für Medizinisch biologische Statistik und Dokumentation an der Universität Marburg. Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Leben 2 Leistungen 3 Werke …   Deutsch Wikipedia


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