fermented fish paste
salted, macerated fish allowed to ferment in the Far East. Spices and colourings may be added

Dictionary of ichthyology. 2009.

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  • Fish paste — may refer to:* Prahok: a paste made from fermented fish that has a pungent smell. A seasoning and condiment used in Cambodian cuisine. * Surimi: a paste made from fresh fish that has been minced and pulverized such that it gains a rubbery texture …   Wikipedia

  • Fish sauce — Thai fish sauce Fish sauce is a condiment that is derived from fish that have been allowed to ferment. It is an essential ingredient in many curries and sauces. Fish sauce is a staple ingredient in numerous cultures in Southeast Asia and the… …   Wikipedia

  • Fermented bean curd — Chinese name Chinese …   Wikipedia

  • Shrimp paste — or shrimp sauce, is a common ingredient used in Southeast Asian and Southern Chinese cuisine. It is known as terasi (also spelled trassi , terasie ) in Indonesian, Ngapi in Burmese kapi (กะปิ) in Thai, Khmer and Lao language, belacan (also… …   Wikipedia

  • gyomiso — fermented fish paste containing salt and wheat bran and inoculated with the fungus Aspergillus oryzae …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • kapi — fermented fish paste (Thailand) …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • mam-ruot — fermented fish paste made from muscle tissue and intestines (Vietnam) …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • padec — fermented fish paste made with rice husks (Laos) …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • Philippine cuisine — Filipino cuisine Philippine cuisine consists of the food, preparation methods and eating customs found in the Philippines. The style of cooking and the food associated with it have evolved over several centuries from its Austronesian origins to a …   Wikipedia

  • Cuisine of Cambodia — Khmer cuisine (Khmer សិល្បៈខាងធ្វើម្ហូបខ្មែរ) is another name for the food widely consumed in the country Cambodia.Khmer cuisine is noted for the use of prahok​​​​ (ប្រហុក), a type of fermented fish paste, in many dishes as a distinctive… …   Wikipedia

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