elevation in rank
change the standing of a name in nomenclature; the change in position of a name in a taxonomic hierarchy, e.g. from subspecies to species

Dictionary of ichthyology. 2009.

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  • elevation in rank — index promotion (advancement) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Rank — Rank, v. i. 1. To be ranged; to be set or disposed, as in a particular degree, class, order, or division. [1913 Webster] Let that one article rank with the rest. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To have a certain grade or degree of elevation in the orders …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • elevation — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Act of raising Nouns 1. elevation; raising, lifting, erection; upheaval, uplift; exaltation, apotheosis, deification (see deity). Informal, heave, hike, boost. See angularity, vertical. 2. (elevated… …   English dictionary for students

  • Elevation (disambiguation) — Elevation, literally (up)lifting something or someone higher (also figuratively), can refer to:*Elevation (liturgy) of consecrated bread and wine in Mass. *Elevation, the height of a geographic location above mean sea level *Elevation, the… …   Wikipedia

  • In Petto — • An Italian translation of the Latin in pectore, in the breast , i.e. in the secret of the heart Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. In Petto     In Petto      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • elevation — el|e|va|tion [ˌelıˈveıʃən] n 1.) [singular] a height above the level of the sea elevation of ▪ The road climbs steadily to an elevation of 1400 feet. 2.) [U] formal an act of moving someone to a more important rank or position elevation to ▪ her… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • elevation — noun 1 (singular) a height above the level of the sea (+ of): The observatory is located on Mt Hopkins at an elevation of 2600m. 2 (U) formal a situation in which someone is given a more important rank or position: His sudden elevation to the… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • In point — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • In the point — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • List of words having different meanings in British and American English: A–L — Differences between American and British English American English …   Wikipedia

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