Lead Lead (l[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Led} (l[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Leading}.] [OE. leden, AS. l[=ae]dan (akin to OS. l[=e]dian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. le[imac][eth]a, Sw. leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. li[eth]an to go; akin to OHG. l[imac]dan, Icel. l[imac][eth]a, Goth. lei[thorn]an (in comp.). Cf. {Lode}, {Loath}.] 1. To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some physical contact or connection; as, a father leads a child; a jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind man. [1913 Webster]

If a blind man lead a blind man, both fall down in the ditch. --Wyclif (Matt. xv. 14.) [1913 Webster]

They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto the brow of the hill. --Luke iv. 29. [1913 Webster]

In thy right hand lead with thee The mountain nymph, sweet Liberty. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain place or end, by making the way known; to show the way, esp. by going with or going in advance of. Hence, figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to lead a traveler; to lead a pupil. [1913 Webster]

The Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to lead them the way. --Ex. xiii. 21. [1913 Webster]

He leadeth me beside the still waters. --Ps. xxiii. 2. [1913 Webster]

This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask. Content, though blind, had I no better guide. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. To conduct or direct with authority; to have direction or charge of; as, to lead an army, an exploring party, or a search; to lead a political party. [1913 Webster]

Christ took not upon him flesh and blood that he might conquer and rule nations, lead armies, or possess places. --South. [1913 Webster]

4. To go or to be in advance of; to precede; hence, to be foremost or chief among; as, the big sloop led the fleet of yachts; the Guards led the attack; Demosthenes leads the orators of all ages. [1913 Webster]

As Hesperus, that leads the sun his way. --Fairfax. [1913 Webster]

And lo ! Ben Adhem's name led all the rest. --Leigh Hunt. [1913 Webster]

5. To draw or direct by influence, whether good or bad; to prevail on; to induce; to entice; to allure; as, to lead one to espouse a righteous cause. [1913 Webster]

He was driven by the necessities of the times, more than led by his own disposition, to any rigor of actions. --Eikon Basilike. [1913 Webster]

Silly women, laden with sins, led away by divers lusts. --2 Tim. iii. 6 (Rev. Ver.). [1913 Webster]

6. To guide or conduct one's self in, through, or along (a certain course); hence, to proceed in the way of; to follow the path or course of; to pass; to spend. Also, to cause (one) to proceed or follow in (a certain course). [1913 Webster]

That we may lead a quiet and peaceable life. --1 Tim. ii. 2. [1913 Webster]

Nor thou with shadowed hint confuse A life that leads melodious days. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

You remember . . . the life he used to lead his wife and daughter. --Dickens. [1913 Webster]

7. (Cards & Dominoes) To begin a game, round, or trick, with; as, to lead trumps; the double five was led. [1913 Webster]

{To lead astray}, to guide in a wrong way, or into error; to seduce from truth or rectitude.

{To lead captive}, to carry or bring into captivity.

{To lead the way}, to show the way by going in front; to act as guide. --Goldsmith. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Leading — Lead ing, n. 1. The act of guiding, directing, governing, or enticing; guidance. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Suggestion; hint; example. [Archaic] Bacon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Leading —   [engl.], Zeilenabstand …   Universal-Lexikon

  • leading — adj *chief, principal, main, foremost, capital Analogous words: governing, ruling (see GOVERN): conducting, directing, managing, controlling (see CONDUCT vb): prominent, outstanding (see NOTICEABLE): eminent (see FAMOUS): preeminent, *supreme,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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  • leading — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ most important or in first place …   English terms dictionary

  • leading — leading1 [led′iŋ] n. 1. a covering or being covered with lead 2. strips or sheets of lead, collectively leading2 [lēd′iŋ] n. the action of one that leads; guidance; direction; leadership adj. 1. that leads; guiding 2. principal; chief …   English World dictionary

  • Leading — Leads redirects here. For the city and metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire, England, see Leeds. For other uses, see Lead (disambiguation). Line leading and Line lead redirect here. For the water navigation concept, see Leading line. For other… …   Wikipedia

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  • leading — 1. adj. & n. adj. chief; most important. n. guidance, leadership. Phrases and idioms: leading aircraftman the rank above aircraftman in the RAF. leading article a newspaper article giving the editorial opinion. leading counsel the senior… …   Useful english dictionary

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