Lavishing
Lavish Lav"ish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lavished} (-[i^]sht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lavishing}.] To expend or bestow with profusion; to use with prodigality; to squander; as, to lavish money or praise. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • lavishing — lav·ish || lævɪʃ v. give in large amounts, expend in great quantities adj. expended in large quantities; generous; extravagant, wasteful …   English contemporary dictionary

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  • Lavish — Lav ish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lavished} ( [i^]sht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lavishing}.] To expend or bestow with profusion; to use with prodigality; to squander; as, to lavish money or praise. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lavished — Lavish Lav ish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lavished} ( [i^]sht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lavishing}.] To expend or bestow with profusion; to use with prodigality; to squander; as, to lavish money or praise. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lavishment — Lav ish*ment ( ment), n. The act of lavishing. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Profusion — Pro*fu sion, n. [L. profusio: cf. F. profusion.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of one who is profuse; a lavishing or pouring out without sting. [1913 Webster] Thy vast profusion to the factious nobles? Rowe. [1913 Webster] 2. Abundance; exuberant… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Bible — For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). The Gutenberg Bible, the first printed Bible …   Wikipedia

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