Lateral strength
Lateral Lat"er*al, a. [L. lateralis, fr. latus, lateris, side: cf. F. lat['e]ral.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sides; as, the lateral walls of a house; the lateral branches of a tree. [1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) Lying at, or extending toward, the side; away from the mesial plane; external; -- opposed to {mesial}. [1913 Webster]

3. Directed to the side; as, a lateral view of a thing. [1913 Webster]

{Lateral cleavage} (Crystallog.), cleavage parallel to the lateral planes.

{Lateral equation} (Math.), an equation of the first degree. [Obs.]

{Lateral line} (Anat.), in fishes, a line of sensory organs along either side of the body, often marked by a distinct line of color.

{Lateral pressure} or {stress} (Mech.), a pressure or stress at right angles to the length, as of a beam or bridge; -- distinguished from longitudinal pressure or stress.

{Lateral strength} (Mech.), strength which resists a tendency to fracture arising from lateral pressure.

{Lateral system} (Bridge Building), the system of horizontal braces (as between two vertical trusses) by which lateral stiffness is secured. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Lateral — Lat er*al, a. [L. lateralis, fr. latus, lateris, side: cf. F. lat[ e]ral.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sides; as, the lateral walls of a house; the lateral branches of a tree. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Lying at, or extending toward, the side; away …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lateral cleavage — Lateral Lat er*al, a. [L. lateralis, fr. latus, lateris, side: cf. F. lat[ e]ral.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sides; as, the lateral walls of a house; the lateral branches of a tree. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Lying at, or extending toward, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lateral equation — Lateral Lat er*al, a. [L. lateralis, fr. latus, lateris, side: cf. F. lat[ e]ral.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sides; as, the lateral walls of a house; the lateral branches of a tree. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Lying at, or extending toward, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lateral line — Lateral Lat er*al, a. [L. lateralis, fr. latus, lateris, side: cf. F. lat[ e]ral.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sides; as, the lateral walls of a house; the lateral branches of a tree. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Lying at, or extending toward, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lateral pressure — Lateral Lat er*al, a. [L. lateralis, fr. latus, lateris, side: cf. F. lat[ e]ral.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sides; as, the lateral walls of a house; the lateral branches of a tree. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Lying at, or extending toward, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lateral system — Lateral Lat er*al, a. [L. lateralis, fr. latus, lateris, side: cf. F. lat[ e]ral.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sides; as, the lateral walls of a house; the lateral branches of a tree. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Lying at, or extending toward, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lateral earth pressure — is the pressure that soil exerts in the horizontal plane. The common applications of lateral earth pressure theory are for the design of ground engineering structures such as retaining walls, basements, tunnels, and to determine the friction on… …   Wikipedia

  • Strength training — This article is about the basic principles to train muscular strength. For strength training using free weights or weight machines, see weight training. The lat. pulldown, which strengthens the arms and back Strength training is the use of… …   Wikipedia

  • Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) of the knee — The knee joint is surrounded by a joint capsule with ligaments strapping the inside and outside of the joint (collateral ligaments) as well as crossing within the joint (cruciate ligaments). These ligaments provide stability and strength to the… …   Medical dictionary

  • Compressive strength — is the capacity of a material or structure to withstand axially directed pushing forces. When the limit of compressive strength is reached, materials are crushed. Concrete can be made to have high compressive strength, e.g. many concrete… …   Wikipedia

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