Laminated arch
laminated lam"i*na`ted, a. 1. Consisting of, or covered with, laminae, or thin plates, sheets, scales, or layers, one over another; laminate. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence: Constructed of thin sheets of material, bonded together to form a composite structure having multiple layers. [PJC]

{Laminated arch} (Arch.), a timber arch made of layers of bent planks secured by treenails. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • laminated — lam i*na ted, a. 1. Consisting of, or covered with, laminae, or thin plates, sheets, scales, or layers, one over another; laminate. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence: Constructed of thin sheets of material, bonded together to form a composite structure… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • arch — arch1 /ahrch/, n. 1. Archit. a. a curved masonry construction for spanning an opening, consisting of a number of wedgelike stones, bricks, or the like, set with the narrower side toward the opening in such a way that forces on the arch are… …   Universalium

  • Glued laminated timber — Glulam frame for the roof of a building. Glued laminated timber, also called Glulam, is a type of structural timber product composed of several layers of dimensioned timber bonded together with durable, moisture resistant adhesives. This material …   Wikipedia

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  • bridge — bridge1 bridgeable, adj. bridgeless, adj. bridgelike, adj. /brij/, n., v., bridged, bridging, adj. n. 1. a structure spanning and providing passage over a river, chasm, road, or the like. 2. a connecting, transitional, or intermediate route or… …   Universalium

  • tunnels and underground excavations — ▪ engineering Introduction        Great tunnels of the world Great tunnels of the worldhorizontal underground passageway produced by excavation or occasionally by nature s action in dissolving a soluble rock, such as limestone. A vertical opening …   Universalium

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