lamb lettuce
Lamb Lamb, n. [AS. lamb; akin to D. & Dan. lam, G. & Sw. lamm, OS., Goth., & Icel. lamb.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) The young of the sheep. [1913 Webster]

2. Any person who is as innocent or gentle as a lamb. [1913 Webster]

3. A simple, unsophisticated person; in the cant of the Stock Exchange, one who ignorantly speculates and is victimized. [1913 Webster]

{Lamb of God}, {The Lamb} (Script.), the Jesus Christ, in allusion to the paschal lamb. [1913 Webster]

The twelve apostles of the Lamb. --Rev. xxi. 14. [1913 Webster]

Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world. --John i. 29.

{Lamb's lettuce} (Bot.), an annual plant with small obovate leaves ({Valerianella olitoria}), often used as a salad; corn salad. [Written also {lamb lettuce}.]

{Lamb's tongue}, a carpenter's plane with a deep narrow bit, for making curved grooves. --Knight.

{Lamb's wool}. (a) The wool of a lamb. (b) Ale mixed with the pulp of roasted apples; -- probably from the resemblance of the pulp of roasted apples to lamb's wool. [Obs.] --Goldsmith. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lamb's lettuce — Lamb Lamb, n. [AS. lamb; akin to D. & Dan. lam, G. & Sw. lamm, OS., Goth., & Icel. lamb.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) The young of the sheep. [1913 Webster] 2. Any person who is as innocent or gentle as a lamb. [1913 Webster] 3. A simple, unsophisticated… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lamb's lettuce — Lettuce Let tuce (l[e^]t t[i^]s), n. [OE. letuce, prob. through Old French from some Late Latin derivative of L. lactuca lettuce, which, according to Varro, is fr. lac, lactis, milk, on account of the milky white juice which flows from it when it …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lamb — Lamb, n. [AS. lamb; akin to D. & Dan. lam, G. & Sw. lamm, OS., Goth., & Icel. lamb.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) The young of the sheep. [1913 Webster] 2. Any person who is as innocent or gentle as a lamb. [1913 Webster] 3. A simple, unsophisticated person; in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lamb of God — Lamb Lamb, n. [AS. lamb; akin to D. & Dan. lam, G. & Sw. lamm, OS., Goth., & Icel. lamb.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) The young of the sheep. [1913 Webster] 2. Any person who is as innocent or gentle as a lamb. [1913 Webster] 3. A simple, unsophisticated… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lamb's tongue — Lamb Lamb, n. [AS. lamb; akin to D. & Dan. lam, G. & Sw. lamm, OS., Goth., & Icel. lamb.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) The young of the sheep. [1913 Webster] 2. Any person who is as innocent or gentle as a lamb. [1913 Webster] 3. A simple, unsophisticated… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lamb's wool — Lamb Lamb, n. [AS. lamb; akin to D. & Dan. lam, G. & Sw. lamm, OS., Goth., & Icel. lamb.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) The young of the sheep. [1913 Webster] 2. Any person who is as innocent or gentle as a lamb. [1913 Webster] 3. A simple, unsophisticated… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lettuce — Let tuce (l[e^]t t[i^]s), n. [OE. letuce, prob. through Old French from some Late Latin derivative of L. lactuca lettuce, which, according to Varro, is fr. lac, lactis, milk, on account of the milky white juice which flows from it when it is cut …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lettuce opium — Lettuce Let tuce (l[e^]t t[i^]s), n. [OE. letuce, prob. through Old French from some Late Latin derivative of L. lactuca lettuce, which, according to Varro, is fr. lac, lactis, milk, on account of the milky white juice which flows from it when it …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lettuce — ► NOUN 1) a cultivated plant with edible leaves that are eaten in salads. 2) used in names of other plants with edible green leaves, e.g. lamb s lettuce. ORIGIN Old French letues, from Latin lactuca, from lac milk (because of its milky juice) …   English terms dictionary

  • lamb'slettuce — lamb s lettuce (lămzʹ) n. See corn salad. * * * …   Universalium

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