Kneeler Kneel"er, n. 1. One who kneels or who worships by or while kneeling. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

2. A cushion or stool to kneel on, such as one attached to a pew in a church. [1913 Webster]

3. (Eccl. Hist.) A name given to certain catechumens and penitents who were permitted to join only in parts of church worship. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Kneeler — is a piece of furniture used for resting in a kneeling position.Prayer kneelerIn many churches, pews are equipped with kneelers in front of the seating bench so members of the can kneel on them instead of the floor. In a few other situations such …   Wikipedia

  • kneeler — ► NOUN 1) a person who kneels. 2) a cushion or bench for kneeling on …   English terms dictionary

  • kneeler — [nēl′ər] n. 1. a person who kneels 2. something to kneel on; specif., a cushion, stool, etc. for worshipers in a church …   English World dictionary

  • kneeler — noun Date: 14th century 1. one that kneels 2. something (as a cushion or board) to kneel on …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • kneeler — /nee leuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that kneels. 2. a bench, pad, or the like, to kneel on. 3. a stone for supporting inclined masonry, as coping stones. 4. knee (def. 8). [1350 1400; ME; see KNEEL, ER1] * * * …   Universalium

  • kneeler — noun a) A person who kneels. All the kneelers sighed with relieve when they were told it was over and they could finally stand up. b) A thing that is designed to be kneeled on. The parish deacon was always pushing to get new kneelers for the… …   Wiktionary

  • kneeler — n. cushioned board or pad used to kneel on; one who kneels; person in a kneeling position …   English contemporary dictionary

  • kneeler — noun 1》 a person who kneels. 2》 a cushion or bench for kneeling on …   English new terms dictionary

  • kneeler — kneel·er …   English syllables

  • kneeler — kneel•er [[t]ˈni lər[/t]] n. 1) a person or thing that kneels 2) a bench, pad, or the like, to kneel on • Etymology: 1350–1400 …   From formal English to slang

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