Keep Keep, n. 1. The act or office of keeping; custody; guard; care; heed; charge. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Pan, thou god of shepherds all, Which of our tender lambkins takest keep. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. The state of being kept; hence, the resulting condition; case; as, to be in good keep. [1913 Webster]

3. The means or provisions by which one is kept; maintenance; support; as, the keep of a horse. [1913 Webster]

Grass equal to the keep of seven cows. --Carlyle. [1913 Webster]

I performed some services to the college in return for my keep. --T. Hughes. [1913 Webster]

4. That which keeps or protects; a stronghold; a fortress; a castle; specifically, the strongest and securest part of a castle, often used as a place of residence by the lord of the castle, especially during a siege; the dungeon. See Illust. of {Castle}. [1913 Webster]

The prison strong, Within whose keep the captive knights were laid. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

The lower chambers of those gloomy keeps. --Hallam. [1913 Webster]

I think . . . the keep, or principal part of a castle, was so called because the lord and his domestic circle kept, abode, or lived there. --M. A. Lower. [1913 Webster]

5. That which is kept in charge; a charge. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Often he used of his keep A sacrifice to bring. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

6. (Mach.) A cap for retaining anything, as a journal box, in place. [1913 Webster]

{To take keep}, to take care; to heed. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Keep — (k[=e]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Kept} (k[e^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Keeping}.] [OE. k[=e]pen, AS. c[=e]pan to keep, regard, desire, await, take, betake; cf. AS. copenere lover, OE. copnien to desire.] 1. To care; to desire. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] I… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • keep — [kiːp] verb kept PTandPP [kept] 1. [transitive] to store something that will be useful: • The Credit Reference Agency keeps files on individuals debt records. • You should keep a supply of forms. 2 …   Financial and business terms

  • Keep — Keep, v. i. 1. To remain in any position or state; to continue; to abide; to stay; as, to keep at a distance; to keep aloft; to keep near; to keep in the house; to keep before or behind; to keep in favor; to keep out of company, or out reach.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • keep — vb 1 Keep, observe, celebrate, solemnize, commemorate are comparable when they mean to pay proper attention or honor to something prescribed, obligatory, or demanded (as by one s nationality, religion, or rank), but they vary widely in their… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • keep — [kēp] vt. kept, keeping [ME kepen < OE cœpan, to behold, watch out for, lay hold of, akin to MLowG kapen, ON kopa, to stare at < ? IE base * ĝab , to look at or for] 1. to observe or pay regard to; specif., a) to observe with due or… …   English World dictionary

  • keep — ► VERB (past and past part. kept) 1) have or retain possession of. 2) retain or reserve for use in the future. 3) put or store in a regular place. 4) (of a perishable commodity) remain in good condition. 5) continue in a specified condition,… …   English terms dictionary

  • keep — keep; green·keep·er; house·keep; house·keep·er; keep·able; keep·er·ing; keep·er·ship; keep·sake; store·keep; keep·er; …   English syllables

  • Keep — 〈f. 20; Seemannsspr.〉 Kerbe, Rille * * * Keep, die; , en [aus dem Niederd. < mniederd. kēp, wohl verw. mit ↑ kappen] (Seemannsspr.): Rille, Kerbe (in einer Boje, einem Block, Mast o. Ä.), die einem darumgelegten Tau Halt gibt. * * * I Keep   …   Universal-Lexikon

  • keep — I (continue) verb be constant, be steadfast, carry forward, carry on, endure, extend, forge ahead, go on, keep going, last, lengthen, live on, maintain, move ahead, never cease, perpetuate, perseverare, persevere, persist, press onward, progress …   Law dictionary

  • keep — The construction keep + object + from + ing verb is idiomatic in current English: • His hands held flat over his ears as if to keep his whole head from flying apart Martin Amis, 1978. The intransitive use of keep + from + ing verb is recorded in… …   Modern English usage

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