Justice of the peace
Peace Peace, n. [OE. pees, pais, OF. pais, paiz, pes, F. paix, L. pax, pacis, akin to pacere, paciscere, pacisci, to make an agreement, and prob. also pangere to fasten. Cf. {Appease}, {Fair}, a., {Fay}, v., {Fang}, {Pacify}, {Pact}, {Pay} to requite.] A state of quiet or tranquillity; freedom from disturbance or agitation; calm; repose; specifically: (a) Exemption from, or cessation of, war with public enemies. (b) Public quiet, order, and contentment in obedience to law. (c) Exemption from, or subjection of, agitating passions; tranquillity of mind or conscience. (d) Reconciliation; agreement after variance; harmony; concord. ``The eternal love and pees.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Note: Peace is sometimes used as an exclamation in commanding silence, quiet, or order. ``Peace! foolish woman.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{At peace}, in a state of peace.

{Breach of the peace}. See under {Breach}.

{Justice of the peace}. See under {Justice}.

{Peace of God}. (Law) (a) A term used in wills, indictments, etc., as denoting a state of peace and good conduct. (b) (Theol.) The peace of heart which is the gift of God.

{Peace offering}. (a) (Jewish Antiq.) A voluntary offering to God in token of devout homage and of a sense of friendly communion with Him. (b) A gift or service offered as satisfaction to an offended person.

{Peace officer}, a civil officer whose duty it is to preserve the public peace, to prevent riots, etc., as a sheriff or constable.

{To hold one's peace}, to be silent; to refrain from speaking.

{To make one's peace with}, to reconcile one with, to plead one's cause with, or to become reconciled with, another. ``I will make your peace with him.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Justice of the peace — Justice Jus tice (j[u^]s t[i^]s), n. [F., fr. L. justitia, fr. justus just. See {Just}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. The quality of being just; conformity to the principles of righteousness and rectitude in all things; strict performance of moral… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Justice of the Peace — (engl., spr. dschößtĭß ŏf thĕ pihß), Friedensrichter (s. Friedensrichte) …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Justice of the peace — (engl., spr. dschöstīs ŏw dhĕ pīß), Friedensrichter, s. Friedensgerichte …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Justice of the Peace — A Justice of the Peace (JP) is a puisne judicial officer appointed by means of a commission to keep the peace. Depending on the jurisdiction, they might dispense summary justice and deal with local administrative applications in common law… …   Wikipedia

  • justice of the peace — a local public officer, usually having jurisdiction to try and determine minor civil and criminal cases and to hold preliminary examinations of persons accused of more serious crimes, and having authority to administer oaths, solemnize marriages …   Universalium

  • justice of the peace — Date: 15th century a local magistrate empowered chiefly to administer summary justice in minor cases, to commit for trial, and to administer oaths and perform marriages …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Justice of the Peace Magazine — Criminal Law Justice Weekly Magazine cover Categories Law Frequency weekly Publisher LexisNexis Butterworths …   Wikipedia

  • Breach of the peace — Peace Peace, n. [OE. pees, pais, OF. pais, paiz, pes, F. paix, L. pax, pacis, akin to pacere, paciscere, pacisci, to make an agreement, and prob. also pangere to fasten. Cf. {Appease}, {Fair}, a., {Fay}, v., {Fang}, {Pacify}, {Pact}, {Pay} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Conservator of the Peace — A Conservator of the Peace is defined as a public official authorized to conserve and maintain the public peace. [BLACK’S LAW DICTIONARY, 6th ed.] Under common law, Conservators of the Peace included judges, [“In England, by the common law, the… …   Wikipedia

  • Clerk of the Peace — A clerk of the peace held an office in England and Wales whose responsibility was the records of the Quarter Sessions and the framing of presentments and indictments. They had legal training, so that they could advise justices of the peace.… …   Wikipedia

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