Abuse of distress
Abuse A*buse", n. [F. abus, L. abusus, fr. abuti. See {Abuse}, v. t.] 1. Improper treatment or use; application to a wrong or bad purpose; misuse; as, an abuse of our natural powers; an abuse of civil rights, or of privileges or advantages; an abuse of language. [1913 Webster]

Liberty may be endangered by the abuses of liberty, as well as by the abuses of power. --Madison. [1913 Webster]

2. Physical ill treatment; injury. ``Rejoice . . . at the abuse of Falstaff.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. A corrupt practice or custom; offense; crime; fault; as, the abuses in the civil service. [1913 Webster]

Abuse after disappeared without a struggle.. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

4. Vituperative words; coarse, insulting speech; abusive language; virulent condemnation; reviling. [1913 Webster]

The two parties, after exchanging a good deal of abuse, came to blows. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

5. Violation; rape; as, abuse of a female child. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Or is it some abuse, and no such thing? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Abuse of distress} (Law), a wrongful using of an animal or chattel distrained, by the distrainer. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Invective; contumely; reproach; scurrility; insult; opprobrium.

Usage: {Abuse}, {Invective}. Abuse is generally prompted by anger, and vented in harsh and unseemly words. It is more personal and coarse than invective. Abuse generally takes place in private quarrels; invective in writing or public discussions. Invective may be conveyed in refined language and dictated by indignation against what is blameworthy. --C. J. Smith. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Abuse of distress — Distress Dis*tress , n. [OE. destresse, distresse, OF. destresse, destrece, F. d[ e]tresse, OF. destrecier to distress, (assumed) LL. districtiare, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere. See {Distrain}, and cf. {Stress}.] 1. Extreme pain or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • abuse of distress — Making use of a distrained animal or chattel and thereby committing a conversion of it …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • abuse of distress — noun /əˈbjuːsəvdɪstrɛs/ a wrongful using of an animal or chattel distrained, by the distrainer …   Wiktionary

  • Distress — Dis*tress , n. [OE. destresse, distresse, OF. destresse, destrece, F. d[ e]tresse, OF. destrecier to distress, (assumed) LL. districtiare, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere. See {Distrain}, and cf. {Stress}.] 1. Extreme pain or suffering;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abuse — A*buse , n. [F. abus, L. abusus, fr. abuti. See {Abuse}, v. t.] 1. Improper treatment or use; application to a wrong or bad purpose; misuse; as, an abuse of our natural powers; an abuse of civil rights, or of privileges or advantages; an abuse of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abuse — This article is about the mistreatment of people or systems. For other uses, see Abuse (disambiguation). Mistreat redirects here. For other uses, see Mistreat (disambiguation). Contents 1 Types and contexts of abuse 1.1 …   Wikipedia

  • abuse — Synonyms and related words: abuse of office, addiction, afflict, aggrieve, assail, assailing, assault, atrocity, attack, bark at, batter, befoul, befoulment, belittle, berate, berating, betongue, betray, betrayal, bewitch, billingsgate, bitter… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • distress — Synonyms and related words: Schmerz, abashment, abuse, ache, aches and pains, aching, adversity, afflict, affliction, aggrieve, agitate, agitation, agonize, agony, ail, all overs, amercement, angary, angst, anguish, annexation, annexure, annoy,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • distress —    , distressed    Distressed material that is nicked and scratched, or in other ways shows signs of age, received through use, abuse, exposure to the weather, etc., or through artifice. Also see abrasive, antiquing, carve, dent, discoloration,… …   Glossary of Art Terms

  • Negligent infliction of emotional distress — Tort law Part of the …   Wikipedia

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