Julian period
Julian Jul"ian (?; 277) a. [L. Julianus, fr. Julius. Cf. {July}, {Gillian}.] Relating to, or derived from, Julius C[ae]sar. [1913 Webster]

{Julian calendar}, the calendar as adjusted by Julius C[ae]sar, in which the year was made to consist of 365 days, each fourth year having 366 days.

{Julian epoch}, the epoch of the commencement of the Julian calendar, or 46 b. c.

{Julian period}, a chronological period of 7,980 years, combining the solar, lunar, and indiction cycles (28 x 19 x 15 = 7,980), being reckoned from the year 4713 B. C., when the first years of these several cycles would coincide, so that if any year of the period be divided by 28, 19, or 15, the remainder will be the year of the corresponding cycle. The Julian period was proposed by Scaliger, to remove or avoid ambiguities in chronological dates, and was so named because composed of Julian years.

{Julian year}, the year of 365 days, 6 hours, adopted in the Julian calendar, and in use until superseded by the Gregorian year, as established in the reformed or Gregorian calendar. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Julian period — ▪ chronology       chronological system now used chiefly by astronomers and based on the consecutive numbering of days from Jan. 1, 4713 BC. Not to be confused with the Julian calendar, the Julian period was proposed by the scholar Joseph Justus… …   Universalium

  • julian period — noun Usage: usually capitalized J Etymology: julian, adjective : a chronological period of 7980 Julian years that combines the solar and lunar cycles and the Roman indiction cycle and is reckoned from the year 4713 B.C. when the first years of… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Julian period —    a unit of time equal to exactly 7980 years in the Julian calendar, that is, exactly 2 914 695 days. See Julian day, above …   Dictionary of units of measurement

  • Julian — Jul ian (?; 277) a. [L. Julianus, fr. Julius. Cf. {July}, {Gillian}.] Relating to, or derived from, Julius C[ae]sar. [1913 Webster] {Julian calendar}, the calendar as adjusted by Julius C[ae]sar, in which the year was made to consist of 365 days …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Julian calendar — Julian Jul ian (?; 277) a. [L. Julianus, fr. Julius. Cf. {July}, {Gillian}.] Relating to, or derived from, Julius C[ae]sar. [1913 Webster] {Julian calendar}, the calendar as adjusted by Julius C[ae]sar, in which the year was made to consist of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Julian epoch — Julian Jul ian (?; 277) a. [L. Julianus, fr. Julius. Cf. {July}, {Gillian}.] Relating to, or derived from, Julius C[ae]sar. [1913 Webster] {Julian calendar}, the calendar as adjusted by Julius C[ae]sar, in which the year was made to consist of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Julian year — Julian Jul ian (?; 277) a. [L. Julianus, fr. Julius. Cf. {July}, {Gillian}.] Relating to, or derived from, Julius C[ae]sar. [1913 Webster] {Julian calendar}, the calendar as adjusted by Julius C[ae]sar, in which the year was made to consist of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Julian day — JDN redirects here. For the military IT system, see Joint Data Network. For the comic book character Julian Gregory Day, see Calendar Man. Not to be confused with Julian year (disambiguation). Julian day is used in the Julian date (JD) system of… …   Wikipedia

  • Julian day — (JD)    a continuous count of days beginning with January 1, 4713 BC ( 4712 CE), which is start of what is called the Julian period. The French scholar Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540 1609) introduced the Julian period in 1582 (the same year the… …   Dictionary of units of measurement

  • Julian May — Born July 10, 1931 (1931 07 10) (age 80) Chicago, Illinois Pen name Bob Cunningham, Judy Dikty, Lee N. Falconer, John Feilen, Wolfgang Amadeus Futslogg, Matthew G. Grant, Granny Roseboro, Ian Thorne, Jean Wright Thorne, George Zanderbergen,… …   Wikipedia

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