Italic order
Italic I*tal"ic, a. [L. Italicus: cf. F. italique. Cf. {Italian}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Relating to Italy or to its people. [1913 Webster]

2. Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; -- so called because dedicated to the States of Italy by the inventor, Aldus Manutius, about the year 1500. [1913 Webster]

{Italic languages}, the group or family of languages of ancient Italy.

{Italic order} (Arch.), the composite order. See {Composite}.

{Italic school}, a term given to the Pythagorean and Eleatic philosophers, from the country where their doctrines were first promulgated.

{Italic version}. See {Itala}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Italic — I*tal ic, a. [L. Italicus: cf. F. italique. Cf. {Italian}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Relating to Italy or to its people. [1913 Webster] 2. Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; so… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Italic languages — Italic I*tal ic, a. [L. Italicus: cf. F. italique. Cf. {Italian}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Relating to Italy or to its people. [1913 Webster] 2. Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Italic school — Italic I*tal ic, a. [L. Italicus: cf. F. italique. Cf. {Italian}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Relating to Italy or to its people. [1913 Webster] 2. Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Italic version — Italic I*tal ic, a. [L. Italicus: cf. F. italique. Cf. {Italian}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Relating to Italy or to its people. [1913 Webster] 2. Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Italic — Composite Com*pos ite (?; 277), a. [L. compositus made up of parts, p. p. of componere. See {Compound}, v. t., and cf. {Compost}.] 1. Made up of distinct parts or elements; compounded; as, a composite language. [1913 Webster] Happiness, like air… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • order — {{11}}order (n.) early 13c., body of persons living under a religious discipline, from O.Fr. ordre (11c.), from earlier ordene, from L. ordinem (nom. ordo) row, rank, series, arrangement, originally a row of threads in a loom, from Italic root… …   Etymology dictionary

  • ancient Italic people — ▪ people Introduction       any of the peoples diverse in origin, language, traditions, stage of development, and territorial extension who inhabited pre Roman Italy, a region heavily influenced by neighbouring Greece (ancient Greek civilization) …   Universalium

  • New Order — This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. For other uses, see New Order (disambiguation). New Order New Order photographed in January 2007; (left to right) Peter Hook, Stephen Morris, and Bernard Sumner …   Wikipedia

  • Composite order — The classical orders. A typical example of the composite order is depicted in the bottom row to the right. The composite order is a mixed order, combining the volutes of the Ionic order capital with the acanthus leaves of the Corinthian order.… …   Wikipedia

  • Tuscan order — Among the classical orders of architecture, the Tuscan order s place in the architectural canon is disputed. The order was only defined in the of classical architecture by Italian architectural theorists of the 16th century. The five orders… …   Wikipedia

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