Composite Com*pos"ite (?; 277), a. [L. compositus made up of parts, p. p. of componere. See {Compound}, v. t., and cf. {Compost}.] 1. Made up of distinct parts or elements; compounded; as, a composite language. [1913 Webster]

Happiness, like air and water . . . is composite. --Landor. [1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) Belonging to a certain order which is composed of the Ionic order grafted upon the Corinthian. It is called also the {Roman} or the {Italic} order, and is one of the five orders recognized by the Italian writers of the sixteenth century. See {Capital}. [1913 Webster]

3. (Bot.) Belonging to the order {Composit[ae]}; bearing involucrate heads of many small florets, as the daisy, thistle, and dandelion. [1913 Webster]

{Composite carriage}, a railroad car having compartments of different classes. [Eng.]

{Composite number} (Math.), one which can be divided exactly by a number exceeding unity, as 6 by 2 or 3..

{Composite photograph} or {Composite portrait}, one made by a combination, or blending, of several distinct photographs. --F. Galton.

{Composite sailing} (Naut.), a combination of parallel and great circle sailing.

{Composite ship}, one with a wooden casing and iron frame. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Italic — I*tal ic, a. [L. Italicus: cf. F. italique. Cf. {Italian}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Relating to Italy or to its people. [1913 Webster] 2. Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; so… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Italic — I*tal ic, n.; pl. {Italics}. (Print.) An Italic letter, character, or type (see {Italic}, a., 2.); often in the plural; as, the Italics are the author s. Italic letters are used to distinguish words for emphasis, importance, antithesis, etc. Also …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Italic — means of or from Italy . The term is most commonly used to refer to the people and languages of what is now Italy from the historic period before the Roman Empire.It may especially refer to: *Italic languages *Ancient Italic peoples *Old Italic… …   Wikipedia

  • italic — ITÁLIC, Ă, italici, ce, adj. 1. Care aparţine Italiei antice, privitor la Italia antică. 2. (Despre caractere tipografice; şi substantivat, f.) Cursiv. – Din fr. italique, lat. italicus. Trimis de valeriu, 21.07.2003. Sursa: DEX 98  ITÁLIC adj.… …   Dicționar Român

  • italic — [i tal′ik, ītal′ik] adj. [see ITALIC: so called because first used in an Italian edition of Virgil (1501)] designating or of a type in which the characters slant upward to the right, used variously, as to emphasize words, indicate foreign words,… …   English World dictionary

  • italic — 1610s (adj.), 1670s (n.) italic type, from L. italicus Italian (see ITALIAN (Cf. Italian)); so called because it was introduced in 1501 by Aldus Manutius, printer of Venice (who also gave his name to Aldine), and first used in an edition of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • italic — ► ADJECTIVE Printing 1) denoting the sloping typeface used especially for emphasis and in foreign words. 2) denoting a style of handwriting, sloping and with pointed letters, resembling 16th century Italian handwriting. ► NOUN (also italics) ▪ an …   English terms dictionary

  • Italic —   [engl.], Kursivschrift …   Universal-Lexikon

  • italic — (izg. itèlik, ob. itàlik) m DEFINICIJA 1. v. italik 2. inform. naredba u računalnim programima za prikaz ukošenih slova, usp. bold (2) ETIMOLOGIJA engl …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • Italic — [i tal′ik, ītal′ik] n. [L Italicus] a branch of the Indo European language family, including Latin, Oscan, Umbrian, and other languages of ancient Italy, as well as Latin s descendants, the Romance languages adj. 1. of these languages 2. of… …   English World dictionary

  • italic — /i tal ik, uy tal /, adj. 1. designating or pertaining to a style of printing types in which the letters usually slope to the right, patterned upon a compact manuscript hand, and used for emphasis, to separate different kinds of information, etc …   Universalium

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