isinglass
Mica Mi"ca, n. [L. mica crumb, grain, particle; cf. F. mica.] (Min.) The name of a group of minerals characterized by highly perfect cleavage, so that they readily separate into very thin leaves, more or less elastic. They differ widely in composition, and vary in color from pale brown or yellow to green or black. The transparent forms are used in lanterns, the doors of stoves, etc., being popularly called {isinglass}. Formerly called also {cat-silver}, and {glimmer}. [1913 Webster]

Note: The important species of the mica group are: {muscovite}, common or potash mica, pale brown or green, often silvery, including {damourite} (also called {hydromica} and {muscovy glass}); {biotite}, iron-magnesia mica, dark brown, green, or black; {lepidomelane}, iron, mica, black; {phlogopite}, magnesia mica, colorless, yellow, brown; {lepidolite}, lithia mica, rose-red, lilac. [1913 Webster] Mica (usually muscovite, also biotite) is an essential constituent of granite, gneiss, and mica slate; {biotite} is common in many eruptive rocks; {phlogopite} in crystalline limestone and serpentine. [1913 Webster]

{Mica diorite} (Min.), an eruptive rock allied to diorite but containing mica (biotite) instead of hornblende.

{Mica powder}, a kind of dynamite containing fine scales of mica.

{Mica schist}, {Mica slate} (Geol.), a schistose rock, consisting of mica and quartz with, usually, some feldspar. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Isinglass — is a substance obtained from the swimbladders of fish (especially Beluga sturgeon); used mainly for the clarification of wine and beer, it is a form of collagen. Use in foods and drinks Prior to the inexpensive production of gelatin and other… …   Wikipedia

  • isinglass — [izɛ̃glas] n. m. ÉTYM. 1803, Volney (→ ex. ci dessous); mot angl., 1660 (isonglas, 1545), altér. probable, d après glass « verre », du néerl. huisenblas, du moyen néerl. huusblas, proprt « vessie d esturgeon », de huus « esturgeon », et blas «… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Isinglass — I sin*glass, n. [Prob. corrupted fr. D. huizenblas (akin to G. hausenblase), lit., bladder of the huso, or large sturgeon; huizen sturgeon + blas bladder. Cf. {Bladder}, {Blast} a gust of wind.] [1913 Webster] 1. A semitransparent, whitish, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • isinglass — 1520s, said to be perversion of Du. huysenblas, lit. sturgeon bladder, from huysen sturgeon + blas bladder; so called because the substance was obtained from it …   Etymology dictionary

  • isinglass — [ī′zin glas΄, ī′ziŋglas΄] n. [prob. altered < MDu huizenblas, lit., sturgeon bladder < huizen, sturgeon + blas, bladder] 1. a form of gelatin prepared from the internal membranes of fish bladders: it is used as a clarifying agent and… …   English World dictionary

  • isinglass — noun /ˈʌɪzɪŋɡlɑːs,ˈaɪzɪŋɡlæs/ a) A form of gelatine obtained from the air bladder of the sturgeon and certain other fish, used as an adhesive and as a clarifying agent for wine and beer. The dashboards genuine leather, / With isinglass curtains y …   Wiktionary

  • isinglass — (entrée créée par le supplément) (i zin glass ) s. m. Nom anglais de la colle de poisson.    Isinglass végétal, nom de la gélose (voy. ce mot au Supplément), Journ. offic. 3 avril 1876, p. 2385 1re col. ÉTYMOLOGIE    Le mot est venu aux Anglais… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • isinglass — [16] Early modern Dutch huysen meant ‘sturgeon’ and blas denoted ‘bladder’. Put them together and you had huysenblas, which English took over as a term not for the sturgeon’s air bladder itself, but for the gelatinous substance obtained from it – …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • isinglass — [16] Early modern Dutch huysen meant ‘sturgeon’ and blas denoted ‘bladder’. Put them together and you had huysenblas, which English took over as a term not for the sturgeon’s air bladder itself, but for the gelatinous substance obtained from it – …   Word origins

  • isinglass — noun Etymology: probably by folk etymology from obsolete Dutch huizenblas, from Middle Dutch huusblase, from huus sturgeon + blase bladder Date: 1535 1. a semitransparent whitish very pure gelatin prepared from the air bladders of fishes (as… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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