Is
Is Is, v. i. [AS. is; akin to G. & Goth. ist, L. est, Gr. ?, Skr. asti. [root]9. Cf. {Am}, {Entity}, {Essence}, {Absent}.] The third person singular of the substantive verb be, in the indicative mood, present tense; as, he is; he is a man. See {Be}. [1913 Webster]

Note: In some varieties of the Northern dialect of Old English, is was used for all persons of the singular. [1913 Webster]

For thy is I come, and eke Alain. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Aye is thou merry. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Note: The idiom of using the present for future events sure to happen is a relic of Old English in which the present and future had the same form; as, this year Christmas is on Friday. [1913 Webster]

To-morrow is the new moon. --1 Sam. xx. 5.


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Is- — See {Iso }. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Is- — Iso I so , Is Is [Gr. i sos equal.] A prefix or combining form, indicating identity, or equality; the same numerical value; as in isopod, isomorphous, isochromatic. Specif.: (a) (Chem.) Applied to certain compounds having the same composition but …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • is — See: SUCH AS IT IS, THAT IS …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • is — See: SUCH AS IT IS, THAT IS …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • is — I. Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German ist is (from sīn to be), Latin est (from esse to be), Greek esti (from einai to be) present third singular of be dialect present first & second singular of be dialect present …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • IS — information system; interswitch …   Military dictionary

  • IS — abbreviation information system …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • is- — or iso combining form Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from isos equal 1. equal ; homogeneous ; uniform < isentropic > 2. isomeric < isocyanate > 3. for or from different individuals of the same species < iso …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Is — abbreviation see Isa …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Is the glass half empty or half full? — is a common expression, used rhetorically to indicate that a particular situation could be a cause for optimism (half full) or pessimism (half empty); or as a general litmus test to simply determine if an individual is an optimist or a pessimist …   Wikipedia

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