Inwalling
Inwall In*wall" ([i^]n*w[add]l"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inwalled} ([i^]n*w[add]ld"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Inwalling}.] To inclose or fortify as with a wall. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • London —    The capital of the Empire and from early times an important centre of trade and commerce. On the northern bank of the River Thames.    The first authentic mention of Londinium, as it was called by the Romans, occurs in Tacitus, Annales, Lib.… …   Dictionary of London

  • Inwall — In*wall ([i^]n*w[add]l ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inwalled} ([i^]n*w[add]ld ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Inwalling}.] To inclose or fortify as with a wall. Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inwalled — Inwall In*wall ([i^]n*w[add]l ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inwalled} ([i^]n*w[add]ld ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Inwalling}.] To inclose or fortify as with a wall. Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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