Involve In*volve", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Involved}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Involving}.] [L. involvere, involutum, to roll about, wrap up; pref. in- in + volvere to roll: cf. OF. involver. See {Voluble}, and cf. {Involute}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To roll or fold up; to wind round; to entwine. [1913 Webster]

Some of serpent kind . . . involved Their snaky folds. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To envelop completely; to surround; to cover; to hide; to involve in darkness or obscurity. [1913 Webster]

And leave a sing[`e]d bottom all involved With stench and smoke. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. To complicate or make intricate, as in grammatical structure. ``Involved discourses.'' --Locke. [1913 Webster]

4. To connect with something as a natural or logical consequence or effect; to include necessarily; to imply. [1913 Webster]

He knows His end with mine involved. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The contrary necessarily involves a contradiction. --Tillotson. [1913 Webster]

5. To take in; to gather in; to mingle confusedly; to blend or merge. [R.] [1913 Webster]

The gathering number, as it moves along, Involves a vast involuntary throng. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Earth with hell To mingle and involve. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

6. To envelop, infold, entangle, or embarrass; as, to involve a person in debt or misery. [1913 Webster]

7. To engage thoroughly; to occupy, employ, or absorb. ``Involved in a deep study.'' --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

8. (Math.) To raise to any assigned power; to multiply, as a quantity, into itself a given number of times; as, a quantity involved to the third or fourth power.

Syn: To imply; include; implicate; complicate; entangle; embarrass; overwhelm.

Usage: To {Involve}, {Imply}. Imply is opposed to express, or set forth; thus, an implied engagement is one fairly to be understood from the words used or the circumstances of the case, though not set forth in form. Involve goes beyond the mere interpretation of things into their necessary relations; and hence, if one thing involves another, it so contains it that the two must go together by an indissoluble connection. War, for example, involves wide spread misery and death; the premises of a syllogism involve the conclusion. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Involve — may refer to the following organisations: * Involve (UK Think Tank)* INVOLVE (UK National Advisory group)* Involve Records (New Zealand record company)* Involve, a Journal of Mathematics * Involve (Swedish IT company) …   Wikipedia

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  • involve — 1. This heavily used word has extended its meaning from the notion of envelopment or entanglement (it is derived from the Latin word involvere meaning ‘to enwrap’) to less precise forms of connection, as in What does the work involve? and No… …   Modern English usage

  • involve — (v.) late 14c., envelop, surround, from L. involvere envelop, surround, overwhelm, lit. roll into, from in in (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + volvere to roll (see VULVA (Cf. vulva)). Originally envelop, surround, sense of take in, include first …   Etymology dictionary

  • involve — [v] draw in; include absorb, affect, argue, associate, bind, catch, commit, complicate, comprehend, comprise, compromise, concern, connect, contain, cover, denote, embrace, embroil, engage, engross, enmesh, entail, entangle, grip, hold, hook,… …   New thesaurus

  • involve — ► VERB 1) (of a situation or event) include as a necessary part or result. 2) cause to experience or participate in an activity or situation. DERIVATIVES involvement noun. ORIGIN originally in the senses «enfold» and «entangle»: from Latin… …   English terms dictionary

  • involve — [in välv′, invôlv′] vt. involved, involving [ME involven < L involvere < in , in + volvere, to roll: see WALK] 1. Archaic to enfold or envelop as in a wrapping [fog involved the shoreline] 2. Obs. to wind spirally; coil up 3. to make… …   English World dictionary

  • involve */*/*/ — UK [ɪnˈvɒlv] / US [ɪnˈvɑlv] verb [transitive] Word forms involve : present tense I/you/we/they involve he/she/it involves present participle involving past tense involved past participle involved 1) to include something as a necessary part of an… …   English dictionary

  • involve — verb (T) 1 to include something as a necessary part or result: What will the job involve? | I didn t realize putting on a play involved so much work. | involve doing sth: Every day each of us makes decisions that involve taking a chance. 2 to… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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