Inuring
Inure In*ure", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inuring}.] [From pref. in- in + ure use, work. See {Ure} use, practice, {Opera}, and cf. {Manure}.] To apply in use; to train; to discipline; to use or accustom till use gives little or no pain or inconvenience; to harden; to habituate; to practice habitually. ``To inure our prompt obedience.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

He . . . did inure them to speak little. --Sir T. North. [1913 Webster]

Inured and exercised in learning. --Robynson (More's Utopia). [1913 Webster]

The poor, inured to drudgery and distress. --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

``Here the fortune of the day turned, and all things became adverse to the Romans; the place deep with ooze, sinking under those who stood, slippery to such as advanced; their armor heavy, the waters deep; nor could they wield, in that uneasy situation, their weighty javelins. The barbarians on the contrary, were inured to encounter in the bogs, their persons tall, their spears long, such as could wound at a distance.'' In this morass the Roman army, after an ineffectual struggle, was irrecoverably lost; nor could the body of the emperor ever be found. Such was the fate of Decius, in the fiftieth year of his age; . . . --Gibbon [quoting Tacitus] (Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Ch. 10) [PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Inure — In*ure , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inuring}.] [From pref. in in + ure use, work. See {Ure} use, practice, {Opera}, and cf. {Manure}.] To apply in use; to train; to discipline; to use or accustom till use gives little or no… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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