Abstract terms
Abstract Ab"stract` (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See {Trace}.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

The more abstract . . . we are from the body. --Norris. [1913 Webster]

2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; existing in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult. [1913 Webster]

3. (Logic) (a) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to {concrete}; as, honesty is an abstract word. --J. S. Mill. (b) Resulting from the mental faculty of abstraction; general as opposed to particular; as, ``reptile'' is an abstract or general name. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

A concrete name is a name which stands for a thing; an abstract name which stands for an attribute of a thing. A practice has grown up in more modern times, which, if not introduced by Locke, has gained currency from his example, of applying the expression ``abstract name'' to all names which are the result of abstraction and generalization, and consequently to all general names, instead of confining it to the names of attributes. --J. S. Mill. [1913 Webster]

4. Abstracted; absent in mind. ``Abstract, as in a trance.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{An abstract idea} (Metaph.), an idea separated from a complex object, or from other ideas which naturally accompany it; as the solidity of marble when contemplated apart from its color or figure.

{Abstract terms}, those which express abstract ideas, as beauty, whiteness, roundness, without regarding any object in which they exist; or abstract terms are the names of orders, genera or species of things, in which there is a combination of similar qualities.

{Abstract numbers} (Math.), numbers used without application to things, as 6, 8, 10; but when applied to any thing, as 6 feet, 10 men, they become concrete.

{Abstract mathematics} or {Pure mathematics}. See {Mathematics}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Abstract — Ab stract (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See {Trace}.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The more abstract . . . we are from the body. Norris. [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abstract mathematics — Abstract Ab stract (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See {Trace}.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The more abstract . . . we are from the body. Norris. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abstract numbers — Abstract Ab stract (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See {Trace}.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The more abstract . . . we are from the body. Norris. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abstract Detail — In traditional philosophy a concrete term is defined as a word which denotes a particular person or thing, and an abstract term is defined as a noun which denotes qualities that exist only as attributes of particular persons or things. A sentence …   Wikipedia

  • abstract — ab|stract1 [ˈæbstrækt] adj [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of abstrahere, from abs away + trahere to pull ] 1.) based on general ideas or principles rather than specific examples or real events = ↑theoretical abstract… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • abstract of title — abstract of title: a summary statement of the successive conveyances and other facts on which a title to a piece of land rests Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. abstract of title n …   Law dictionary

  • abstract — ab·stract / ab ˌstrakt/ n 1: a summary of a legal document 2: abstract of title ab·stract /ab strakt, ab ˌstrakt/ vt Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law …   Law dictionary

  • Abstract management — is the process of accepting and preparing abstracts for presentation at an academic conference. The process consists of either invited or proffered submissions of the abstract or summary of work. The abstract typically states the hypothesis,… …   Wikipedia

  • abstract — adj Abstract, ideal, transcendent, transcendental are closely analogous rather than synonymous terms. The difference in meaning between abstract and ideal is not apparent when they are applied to things which are admirable in actuality as well as …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • abstract of title — A chronological history of property showing the chain of title from its original grant to the present ownership. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012 …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

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