Inhumed
Inhume In*hume", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inhumed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inhuming}.] [Cf. F. inhumer. See {Inhumate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To deposit, as a dead body, in the earth; to bury; to inter. [1913 Webster]

Weeping they bear the mangled heaps of slain, Inhume the natives in their native plain. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. To bury or place in warm earth for chemical or medicinal purposes. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • inhumed — adjective placed in a grave the hastily buried corpses • Syn: ↑buried, ↑interred • Ant: ↑unburied (for: ↑buried) • Similar to: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

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  • Inhume — In*hume , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inhumed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inhuming}.] [Cf. F. inhumer. See {Inhumate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To deposit, as a dead body, in the earth; to bury; to inter. [1913 Webster] Weeping they bear the mangled heaps of slain,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inhuming — Inhume In*hume , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inhumed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inhuming}.] [Cf. F. inhumer. See {Inhumate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To deposit, as a dead body, in the earth; to bury; to inter. [1913 Webster] Weeping they bear the mangled heaps of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • inhume — transitive verb (inhumed; inhuming) Etymology: probably from French inhumer, from Medieval Latin inhumare, from Latin in + humus earth more at humble Date: 1604 bury, inter • inhumation noun …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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