Ingratiate In*gra"ti*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ingratiated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ingratiating}.] [Pref. in- in + L. gratia. See {Grace}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To introduce or commend to the favor of another; to bring into favor; to insinuate; -- used reflexively, and followed by with before the person whose favor is sought. [1913 Webster]

Lysimachus . . . ingratiated himself both with Philip and his pupil. --Budgell. [1913 Webster]

2. To recommend; to render easy or agreeable; -- followed by to. [Obs.] --Dr. J. Scott. [1913 Webster]

What difficulty would it [the love of Christ] not ingratiate to us? --Hammond. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ingratiate — a 17c Latinate loanword, is now normally used reflexively (with oneself etc.) in the meaning ‘to render oneself agreeable to someone, to bring oneself into favour with someone’: • The child glared at me so fiercely that I tried to ingratiate… …   Modern English usage

  • ingratiate — ► VERB (ingratiate oneself) ▪ bring oneself into favour with someone by flattering or trying to please them. DERIVATIVES ingratiating adjective ingratiation noun. ORIGIN from Latin in gratiam into favour …   English terms dictionary

  • Ingratiate — In*gra ti*ate, v. i. To gain favor. [R.] Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ingratiate — index propitiate Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • ingratiate — (v.) 1620s, possibly via 16c. Italian ingraziarsi to bring (oneself) into favor, from L. in gratiam for the favor of, from in in (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + gratia favor, grace (see GRACE (Cf. grace)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • ingratiate — oneself …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • ingratiate — [v] get on the good side of someone attract, blandish, brownnose*, captivate, charm, crawl, flatter, get in with*, grovel, hand a line*, insinuate oneself, kowtow*, play up to*, seek favor, truckle; concepts 7,22,68 Ant. deter, disgust, repel …   New thesaurus

  • ingratiate — [in grā′shē āt΄] vt. ingratiated, ingratiating [prob. via It ingratiare (now ingraziare) < L phr. in gratiam, for the favor of < in , in + gratia, favor, GRACE] to make acceptable; esp., to bring (oneself) into another s favor or good… …   English World dictionary

  • ingratiate — UK [ɪnˈɡreɪʃɪeɪt] / US [ɪnˈɡreɪʃɪˌeɪt] verb Word forms ingratiate : present tense I/you/we/they ingratiate he/she/it ingratiates present participle ingratiating past tense ingratiated past participle ingratiated ingratiate yourself with someone …   English dictionary

  • ingratiate — v. (D; refl.) to ingratiate with (she ingratiated herself with the boss) * * * [ɪn greɪʃɪeɪt] (D; refl.) to ingratiate with (she ingratiated herself with the boss) …   Combinatory dictionary

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