Inductive philosophy
Inductive In*duct"ive, a. [LL. inductivus: cf. F. inductif. See {Induce}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Leading or drawing; persuasive; tempting; -- usually followed by to. [1913 Webster]

A brutish vice, Inductive mainly to the sin of Eve. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. Tending to induce or cause. [R.] [1913 Webster]

They may be . . . inductive of credibility. --Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster]

3. Leading to inferences; proceeding by, derived from, or using, induction; as, inductive reasoning. [1913 Webster]

4. (Physics) (a) Operating by induction; as, an inductive electrical machine. (b) Facilitating induction; susceptible of being acted upon by induction; as, certain substances have a great inductive capacity. [1913 Webster]

{Inductive embarrassment} (Physics), the retardation in signaling on an electric wire, produced by lateral induction.

{Inductive philosophy} or {Inductive method}. See {Philosophical induction}, under {Induction}.

{Inductive sciences}, those sciences which admit of, and employ, the inductive method, as astronomy, botany, chemistry, etc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Inductive — In*duct ive, a. [LL. inductivus: cf. F. inductif. See {Induce}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Leading or drawing; persuasive; tempting; usually followed by to. [1913 Webster] A brutish vice, Inductive mainly to the sin of Eve. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inductive embarrassment — Inductive In*duct ive, a. [LL. inductivus: cf. F. inductif. See {Induce}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Leading or drawing; persuasive; tempting; usually followed by to. [1913 Webster] A brutish vice, Inductive mainly to the sin of Eve. Milton. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inductive method — Inductive In*duct ive, a. [LL. inductivus: cf. F. inductif. See {Induce}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Leading or drawing; persuasive; tempting; usually followed by to. [1913 Webster] A brutish vice, Inductive mainly to the sin of Eve. Milton. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inductive sciences — Inductive In*duct ive, a. [LL. inductivus: cf. F. inductif. See {Induce}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Leading or drawing; persuasive; tempting; usually followed by to. [1913 Webster] A brutish vice, Inductive mainly to the sin of Eve. Milton. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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