induction
Magnetic Mag*net"ic, Magnetical Mag*net"ic*al, a. [L. magneticus: cf. F. magn['e]tique.] 1. Pertaining to the magnet; possessing the properties of the magnet, or corresponding properties; as, a magnetic bar of iron; a magnetic needle. [1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to, or characterized by, the earth's magnetism; as, the magnetic north; the magnetic meridian. [1913 Webster]

3. Capable of becoming a magnet; susceptible to magnetism; as, the magnetic metals. [1913 Webster]

4. Endowed with extraordinary personal power to excite the feelings and to win the affections; attractive; inducing attachment. [1913 Webster]

She that had all magnetic force alone. --Donne. [1913 Webster]

5. Having, susceptible to, or induced by, animal magnetism, so called; hypnotic; as, a magnetic sleep. See {Magnetism}. [Archaic] [1913 Webster +PJC]

{Magnetic amplitude}, {attraction}, {dip}, {induction}, etc. See under {Amplitude}, {Attraction}, etc.

{Magnetic battery}, a combination of bar or horseshoe magnets with the like poles adjacent, so as to act together with great power.

{Magnetic compensator}, a contrivance connected with a ship's compass for compensating or neutralizing the effect of the iron of the ship upon the needle.

{Magnetic curves}, curves indicating lines of magnetic force, as in the arrangement of iron filings between the poles of a powerful magnet.

{Magnetic elements}. (a) (Chem. Physics) Those elements, as iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, etc., which are capable or becoming magnetic. (b) (Physics) In respect to terrestrial magnetism, the declination, inclination, and intensity. (c) See under {Element}.

{Magnetic fluid}, the hypothetical fluid whose existence was formerly assumed in the explanations of the phenomena of magnetism; -- no longer considered a meaningful concept.

{Magnetic iron}, or {Magnetic iron ore}. (Min.) Same as {Magnetite}.

{Magnetic needle}, a slender bar of steel, magnetized and suspended at its center on a sharp-pointed pivot, or by a delicate fiber, so that it may take freely the direction of the magnetic meridian. It constitutes the essential part of a compass, such as the mariner's and the surveyor's.

{Magnetic poles}, the two points in the opposite polar regions of the earth at which the direction of the dipping needle is vertical.

{Magnetic pyrites}. See {Pyrrhotite}.

{Magnetic storm} (Terrestrial Physics), a disturbance of the earth's magnetic force characterized by great and sudden changes.

{Magnetic telegraph}, a telegraph acting by means of a magnet. See {Telegraph}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • induction — [ ɛ̃dyksjɔ̃ ] n. f. • XIVe; « suggestion » 1290; lat. inductio 1 ♦ Opération mentale qui consiste à remonter des faits à la loi, de cas donnés (propositions inductrices) le plus souvent singuliers ou spéciaux, à une proposition plus générale. ⇒… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Induction — • Induction is the conscious mental process by which we pass from the perception of particular phenomena (things and events) to the knowledge of general truths Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Induction     Induction …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Induction — In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to make this… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • induction — in‧duc‧tion [ɪnˈdʌkʆn] noun HUMAN RESOURCES 1. [countable, uncountable] the introduction and training of someone into a new job: • departmental induction courses • A team from personnel will conduct the inductions. 2 …   Financial and business terms

  • induction — Induction. s. f. v. Instigation, impulsion. S il a peché, s il a failli. ça esté par induction, à vostre induction. Il signifie aussi, Consequence que l on tire. Tirer une induction d une proposition …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • induction — induction, inductive The inverse of deduction . Induction begins from particular observations from which empirical generalizations are made. These generalizations then form the basis for theory building. So called analytic induction is common in… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • induction — (n.) late 14c., advancement toward the grace of God; also (c.1400) formal installation of a clergyman, from O.Fr. induction (14c.) or directly from L. inductionem (nom. inductio) a leading in, introduction, noun of action from pp. stem of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • induction — [n1] taking in, initiation consecration, draft, entrance, greetings, inaugural, inauguration, installation, instatement, institution, introduction, investiture, ordination, selection; concepts 320,384,685 Ant. blackballing, expulsion, rejection… …   New thesaurus

  • induction — Induction, Suasio, Inductus, huius inductus. L induction d une loy, Induire le cas d une loy à une autre, Ius translatitium. Bud …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • induction — [in duk′shən] n. [OFr < L inductio] 1. an inducting or being inducted; installation, initiation, etc. 2. Archaic an introduction; preface or prelude 3. an inducing, or bringing about 4. a bringing forward of separate facts or instances, esp.… …   English World dictionary

  • induction — induction. См. индукция. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

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