Indorsing
Indorse In*dorse", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Elephants indorsed with towers. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To write upon the back or outside of a paper or letter, as a direction, heading, memorandum, or address. [1913 Webster]

3. (Law & Com.) To write one's name, alone or with other words, upon the back of (a paper), for the purpose of transferring it, or to secure the payment of a note, draft, or the like; to guarantee the payment, fulfillment, performance, or validity of, or to certify something upon the back of (a check, draft, writ, warrant of arrest, etc.). [1913 Webster]

4. To give one's name or support to; to sanction; to aid by approval; to approve; as, to indorse an opinion. [1913 Webster]

{To indorse in blank}, to write one's name on the back of a note or bill, leaving a blank to be filled by the holder. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • indorsing — in·dorse || ɪn dÉ”rs / dɔːs v. sign one s name (on the back of a check, etc.); approve, sanction (also endorse) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • endorse — Indorse In*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Elephants indorsed with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indorse — In*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Elephants indorsed with towers.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indorsed — Indorse In*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Elephants indorsed with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To indorse in blank — Indorse In*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Elephants indorsed with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • bill of lading — bill of lad·ing / lā diŋ/: a document issued by a carrier that lists goods being shipped and specifies the terms of their transport ◇ A bill of lading serves as a receipt for the goods, a contract for the transport of the goods, and a document of …   Law dictionary

  • accommodation bill — a bill of exchange accepted by an accommodation party, that is, a person signing without receiving value and for the purpose of lending his name (and his credit) to someone else. An accommodation party is liable on the bill to a holder for value …   Law dictionary

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