Indirect demonstration
Demonstration Dem`on*stra"tion, n. [L. demonstratio: cf. F. d['e]monstration.] 1. The act of demonstrating; an exhibition; proof; especially, proof beyond the possibility of doubt; indubitable evidence, to the senses or reason. [1913 Webster]

Those intervening ideas which serve to show the agreement of any two others are called ``proofs;'' and where agreement or disagreement is by this means plainly and clearly perceived, it is called demonstration. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

2. An expression, as of the feelings, by outward signs; a manifestation; a show. See also sense 7 for a more specific related meaning. [1913 Webster +PJC]

Did your letters pierce the queen to any demonstration of grief? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Loyal demonstrations toward the prince. --Prescott. [1913 Webster]

3. (Anat.) The exhibition and explanation of a dissection or other anatomical preparation. [1913 Webster]

4. (Mil.) a decisive exhibition of force, or a movement indicating an attack. [1913 Webster]

5. (Logic) The act of proving by the syllogistic process, or the proof itself. [1913 Webster]

6. (Math.) A course of reasoning showing that a certain result is a necessary consequence of assumed premises; -- these premises being definitions, axioms, and previously established propositions. [1913 Webster]

7. a public gathering of people to express some sentiment or feelings by explicit means, such as picketing, parading, carrying signs or shouting, usually in favor of or opposed to some action of government or of a business. [PJC]

8. the act of showing how a certain device, machine or product operates, or how a procedure is performed; -- usually done for the purpose of inducing prospective customers to buy a product; as, a demonstration of the simple operation of a microwave oven. [PJC]

{Direct demonstration}, or {Positive demonstration}, (Logic & Math.), one in which the correct conclusion is the immediate sequence of reasoning from axiomatic or established premises; -- opposed to

{Indirect demonstration}, or {Negative demonstration} (called also {reductio ad absurdum}), in which the correct conclusion is an inference from the demonstration that any other hypothesis must be incorrect. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Indirect demonstration — Indirect In di*rect , a. [Pref. in not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. [1913 Webster] 2. Not tending to an aim,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indirect — In di*rect , a. [Pref. in not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. [1913 Webster] 2. Not tending to an aim, purpose, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indirect claims — Indirect In di*rect , a. [Pref. in not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. [1913 Webster] 2. Not tending to an aim,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indirect discourse — Indirect In di*rect , a. [Pref. in not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. [1913 Webster] 2. Not tending to an aim,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indirect evidence — Indirect In di*rect , a. [Pref. in not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. [1913 Webster] 2. Not tending to an aim,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indirect tax — Indirect In di*rect , a. [Pref. in not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. [1913 Webster] 2. Not tending to an aim,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Demonstration — Dem on*stra tion, n. [L. demonstratio: cf. F. d[ e]monstration.] 1. The act of demonstrating; an exhibition; proof; especially, proof beyond the possibility of doubt; indubitable evidence, to the senses or reason. [1913 Webster] Those intervening …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • indirect — indirect, e [ ɛ̃dirɛkt ] adj. • 1416; lat. indirectus ♦ Qui n est pas direct. 1 ♦ Qui n est pas en ligne droite, qui fait un ou plusieurs détours. ⇒ courbe, détourné. Itinéraire indirect. Éclairage indirect, qui éclaire par réflexion sur les… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • indirect — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin indirectus, from Latin in + directus direct more at dress Date: 14th century not direct: as a. (1) deviating from a direct line or course ; roundabout (2) not going straight to the point <… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Direct demonstration — Demonstration Dem on*stra tion, n. [L. demonstratio: cf. F. d[ e]monstration.] 1. The act of demonstrating; an exhibition; proof; especially, proof beyond the possibility of doubt; indubitable evidence, to the senses or reason. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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