Incorporeal hereditament
Incorporeal In`cor*po"re*al, a. [Pref. in- not + corporeal: cf. L. incorporeus. Cf. {Incorporal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not corporeal; not having a material body or form; not consisting of matter; immaterial. [1913 Webster]

Thus incorporeal spirits to smaller forms Reduced their shapes immense. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Sense and perception must necessarily proceed from some incorporeal substance within us. --Bentley. [1913 Webster]

2. (Law) Existing only in contemplation of law; not capable of actual visible seizin or possession; not being an object of sense; intangible; -- opposed to {corporeal}. [1913 Webster]

{Incorporeal hereditament}. See under {Hereditament}.

Syn: Immaterial; unsubstantial; bodiless; spiritual. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • incorporeal hereditament — ➔ hereditament * * * incorporeal hereditament UK US noun [C] ► PROPERTY, LAW something which can be inherited (= left to someone by a person who has died) but does not physically exist: »The right to use air space over property is an incorporeal… …   Financial and business terms

  • incorporeal hereditament — index heritage Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 incorporeal hereditament …   Law dictionary

  • incorporeal hereditament — A right without the substance of a body but issuing out of a substance of real or personal property, such as rent issuing out of land, and capable of being inherited. 42 Am J1st Prop § 17 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • hereditament — her‧e‧dit‧a‧ment [ˌherˈdɪtəmənt] noun [countable] LAW a piece of property that can be inheritEd: • Rates are not payable on any unoccupied hereditament for any period during which the owner was prohibited by law from occupying the property.… …   Financial and business terms

  • Incorporeal — In cor*po re*al, a. [Pref. in not + corporeal: cf. L. incorporeus. Cf. {Incorporal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not corporeal; not having a material body or form; not consisting of matter; immaterial. [1913 Webster] Thus incorporeal spirits to smaller… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hereditament — Her e*dit a*ment, n. [LL. hereditamentum. See {Hereditable}.] (Law) Any species of property that may be inherited; lands, tenements, anything corporeal or incorporeal, real, personal, or mixed, that may descend to an heir. Blackstone. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hereditament — her·e·dit·a·ment /ˌher ə di tə mənt/ n [Medieval Latin hereditamentum, from Late Latin hereditare to inherit, from Latin hered heres heir]: inheritable property Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • incorporeal — in·cor·po·re·al /ˌin kȯr pōr ē əl/ adj: not tangible: having no material body or form incorporeal hereditaments an incorporeal right compare corporeal Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • Hereditament — That which could be inherited. As it suggests, corporeal hereditament was something physical, such as land or goods; incorporeal hereditament was intangible but real, e.g. a right to something; as *Bracton says, an incorporeal thing does not… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Hereditament — In law, a hereditament (from Lat. hereditare , to inherit, heres , heir) is any kind of property that can be inherited.Hereditaments are divided into corporeal and incorporeal. Corporeal hereditaments are such as affect the senses, and may be… …   Wikipedia

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