Incense wood
Incense In"cense, n. [OE. encens, F. encens, L. incensum, fr. incensus, p. p. of incendere to burn. See {Incense} to inflame.] [1913 Webster] 1. The perfume or odors exhaled from spices and gums when burned in celebrating religious rites or as an offering to some deity. [1913 Webster]

A thick cloud of incense went up. --Ezek. viii. 11. [1913 Webster]

2. The materials used for the purpose of producing a perfume when burned, as fragrant gums, spices, frankincense, etc. [1913 Webster]

Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron, took either of them his censer, and put fire therein, and put incense thereon. --Lev. x. 1. [1913 Webster]

3. Also used figuratively. [1913 Webster]

Or heap the shrine of luxury and pride, With incense kindled at the Muse's flame. --Gray. [1913 Webster]

{Incense tree}, the name of several balsamic trees of the genus {Bursera} (or {Icica}) mostly tropical American. The gum resin is used for incense. In Jamaica the {Chrysobalanus Icaco}, a tree related to the plums, is called incense tree.

{Incense wood}, the fragrant wood of the tropical American tree {Bursera heptaphylla}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • incense wood — noun fragrant wood of two incense trees of the genus Protium • Hypernyms: ↑wood • Substance Holonyms: ↑incense tree * * * noun : the fragrant wood of either of two tropical American trees (Protium heptaphyllum and P. guianense) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Incense — In cense, n. [OE. encens, F. encens, L. incensum, fr. incensus, p. p. of incendere to burn. See {Incense} to inflame.] [1913 Webster] 1. The perfume or odors exhaled from spices and gums when burned in celebrating religious rites or as an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Incense tree — Incense In cense, n. [OE. encens, F. encens, L. incensum, fr. incensus, p. p. of incendere to burn. See {Incense} to inflame.] [1913 Webster] 1. The perfume or odors exhaled from spices and gums when burned in celebrating religious rites or as an …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Incense — Burning incense Incense (from Latin: incendere, to burn )[1] is composed of aromatic biotic materials, which release fragrant smoke when burned. The term incense refers to the substance itself, rather than to the odor that it produces. It is used …   Wikipedia

  • incense tree — noun any of various tropical trees of the family Burseraceae yielding fragrant gums or resins that are burned as incense • Hypernyms: ↑tree • Hyponyms: ↑elephant tree, ↑Bursera microphylla, ↑gumbo limbo, ↑Bursera simaruba, ↑Boswellia carteri …   Useful english dictionary

  • Incense clock — The incense clock (香鐘, 香钟, xiāng zhōng in Chinese) is a special timekeeping device invented in China during the Song Dynasty (960 1279) that spread to neighboring countries such as Japan. The clocks bodies are effectively specialized censers that …   Wikipedia

  • Incense in China — A Western Han inlaid bronze mountain censer Incense in China is traditionally used in a wide range of Chinese cultural activities including, religious ceremonies, ancestor veneration, traditional medicine, and in daily life. Known as xiang… …   Wikipedia

  • incense — incense1 /in sens/, n., v., incensed, incensing. n. 1. an aromatic gum or other substance producing a sweet odor when burned, used in religious ceremonies, to enhance a mood, etc. 2. the perfume or smoke arising from such a substance when burned …   Universalium

  • Wood economy — The existence of a wood economy, or more correctly, a forest economy (since in many countries a bamboo economy predominates), is a prominent matter in many developing countries as well as in many other nations with temperate climate and… …   Wikipedia

  • Incense Box — A box for incense which is usually of silver or carved wood. It is placed at the right hand of the celebrant. A small spoon is usually placed in the incense box and used for putting the incense in the censer …   Dictionary of church terms

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